Mehmed II

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Related to Mehmed the Conqueror: Bayezid II, Murad II, Suleiman the Magnificent, Selim the Sot

Mehmed II

 

known as Fatih (“the conqueror”). Born Mar. 30, 1432, in Edirne (Adrianople); died Apr. 3 (or May 3), 1481, in Hunkârçiri. Turkish sultan (reigned 1444; 1451–81).

Mehmed II conducted a policy of conquest and personally headed the campaigns of the Turkish Army. In 1453 he conquered Constantinople and made it the capital of the Ottoman Empire, thereby putting an end to Byzantium. Mehmed’s reign also saw the annexation of Serbia (1459), the conquest of Morea (1460), the Trabzon (Trebizond) Empire (1461), Bosnia (1463), and the island of Euboea (1471), the completion of the conquest of Albania (1479), and the subjugation of the Crimean Khanate (1475). The first law code of the Ottoman Empire was compiled under Mehmed II.

References in periodicals archive ?
The gold coin had Erdoy-an's picture on one its faces while the other face had the signature of Mehmed the Conqueror.
Most of the 'history' in the book deals with Mehmed the Conqueror, who is always depicted as the anti-Christ mentioned in the Bible.
Almost immediately after Mehmed the Conqueror swept Constantinople in 1453, the Hagia Sophia was converted into a mosque, called the Ayasofya Camii.
These included humanist resentment at the elimination of secretarial sinecures in the Curial bureaucracy; the homoerotic and pederastic sentiments of certain Roman Academy members, heightened by immersion in Martial and other Roman poets that, in the pope's mind, evinced moral depravity and verged on heresy; and fears (to some extent justified) of contact, and even collusion, with the Ottoman sultan, Mehmed the Conqueror, then posing a genuine threat of invasion to the Italian peninsula.
The Topkapi Palace, which was the official residential of the Ottoman sultans beginning from Mehmed the Conqueror till Sultan Abdulmecid who was the thirty-first sultan, was used as the center of the state administration, education and art of the Empire for nearly 400 years.
The Sultans themselves, as in the days of Mehmed the Conqueror, became the principal patrons of Western artists in Constantinople.
The mosque was originally built by ymam Ali Efendi, a relative of the renowned Islamic scholar AkE-emseddin, who lived during the reign of Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror.
Gazi society, however, was reconstructed differently by fifteenth-century historians with various goals: to explain Timur's breakup of the Ottoman Empire by the loss of an original Muslim/tribal purity and adoption of civilization's corruption, to legitimize the reconstituted post-Timurid empire by linking its rulers with Central Asian nomadic royalty, or to deploy the gazi model to critique the imperial policies of Mehmed the Conqueror.
Since the time of Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror (Fatih), the ideal of the eternal preservation of the state was represented by the "social center," while the reason of the state was advocated by the "bureaucratic center" and these two centers occasionally clashed with each other.
The second, the Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge, named after 15th-century Ottoman Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror, was completed in 1988.
If we did not have such complexes, we would not have discussed whether the current successor of the Greek patriarch, whose autonomy Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror revived, is ecumenical or not, and we would be boasting with the fact that our country is hosting the leader and institution of the second largest sect of Christianity.