Mein Kampf


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Mein Kampf

Adolf Hitler’s autobiography, including his theories on treatment of the Jews. [Ger. Hist.: Mein Kampf]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Hitler-owned copy of Mein Kampf is one of more than 400 military artifacts being auctioned at Gottlieb's online auction.
At its peak Mein Kampf earned him one million reichsmarks a year without paying a pfennig in tax.
Mein Kampf was translated into Kurdish from Arabic by Salah Naqshbandi.
According to the IfZ, the two volumes of Mein Kampf were first published in 1925 and 1926 and the copyright expires in 2015, 70 years after Hitler's death in 1945.
Hitler gave the Mein Kampf book to a fellow inmate, an early member of the Nazi Party, at Landsberg Prison following his failed attempt to over-throthe German government.
It asks readers for additions to its bibliography: I was going to offer Mein Kampf but, although I argued passionately that Neo-vernacular was National Socialism's favourite housing style, my editor told me not to be so silly.
In addition to entries on individual texts by Kafka, Rilke, Thomas Mann, and Paul Celan, we find essays on Hitler's Mein Kampf, Daniel Libeskind's new Jewish Museum in Berlin, and "spectacles of multiculturalism" and Turkish identity politics in contemporary Germany.
Benjamin's Struggle tells the story of a boy who tries to bring down Hitler by stealing the original manuscript of his auto- biography Mein Kampf.
The best illustration of Brock's technique, though, is this gem: Discussing the success of right-wing books these days (after an age in which, "like followers of occultism, conservatives established their own bookstores and book clubs because existing stores did not stock their works"), Brock notes--purely factually, mind you--that "in its day, Mein Kampf was a best-seller.
In his autobiography, Mein Kampf (German for My Struggle), Hitler wrote that Germans were members of the Aryan race, which was superior because of its "purity.
National Socialism, as a matter of principle, must claim the right to enforce its doctrines without regard to present federal boundaries, upon the entire German nation," he wrote in his 1925 manifesto Mein Kampf.
The meeting and its 'protokol' had 'cleared the way for genocide' based on established Nazi ideology which in it s turn was based on Hitler's Mein Kampf.