Melchizedek

(redirected from Melchisedech)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Melchizedek

or

Melchisedec

(both: mĕlkĭz`ədĕk) [Heb.,=king of righteousness], in the Bible, king of Salem and "priest of the most high God." He blessed Abraham after the defeat of Chedorlaomer, and Abraham gave him tithes from the enemy's spoils. Later, Melchizedek is regarded as an eternal priest, typifying the priesthood of the future Messiah. In the Dead Sea ScrollsDead Sea Scrolls,
ancient leather and papyrus scrolls first discovered in 1947 in caves on the NW shore of the Dead Sea. Most of the documents were written or copied between the 1st cent. B.C. and the first half of the 1st cent. A.D.
..... Click the link for more information.
, Melchizedek, as God's eschatological agent, effects the destruction of the angel Belial and the wicked spirits in league with him.

Melchizedek

Old Testament the priest-king of Salem who blessed Abraham (Genesis 14:18-19) and was taken as a prototype of Christ's priesthood (Hebrews 7)
References in periodicals archive ?
THEVENOT, MELCHISEDECH, Relations de divers Voyages curieux qui n 'ontpoint este publiees, Paris, Thomas Moette, 4, 1664.
Melchisedech sees through the pretense "di pigliarlo nelle parole" (to trap him in his own words 1.
Parere here again denotes the critical moment, and Melchisedech applies his native ingenuity by telling his own story.
The religious novelletta of the three rings told by Melchisedech is a story about generations, about fathers and sons.
Finally, Melchisedech discloses to Saladin the overt meaning of the tale at its end.
Dioneo justifies his tale of the monk and the abbot by declaring pleasure ("piacere") the main object of storytelling; his monk, not unlike Melchisedech, wants "il suo corpo di gravissima pena liberasse" ("freed his body from most severe punishment" Dec.
The moment here is overtly public, before the assembled brothers, and it carries greater weight and shame to the friar than the private, allusive remarks of Melchisedech and the young monk.
Thevenot, Melchisedech, 1663, Relations de divers voyages curieux qui n'ont point este publiees .
Paul had affirmed the priesthood of Christ "according to the order of Melchisedech," who was Priest and King of Salem; it was the very passage that the canonists quoted most often to affirm the superiority of the spiritual power in its Old and New Testament typological precedents of the popes' royal power.