Melmoth the Wanderer


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Melmoth the Wanderer

doomed by a curse to roam the earth for 150 years after his death. [Br. Lit.: Melmoth the Wanderer]
See: Curse

Melmoth the Wanderer

to win souls, he is cursed to roam earth after death. [Br. Lit.: Melmoth the Wanderer]
References in periodicals archive ?
Through analyses of Robert Southey's The Curse of Kehama, Sydney Owenson's The Missionary, and Charles Maturin's Melmoth the Wanderer, Rudd establishes how anxiety about the pernicious influence of Hinduism revives the Gothic form as it was passing out of fashion, providing it with a new target to follow in the chiaroscuro shadows of Catholicism and Jacobinism.
NEWPORT: The Riverfront (01633 656757), Melmoth The Wanderer.
Melmoth The Wanderer Blackwood Miners' Institute, 8pm Tickets: PS12, concs PS10.
For instance, in "'The Terrors of a Guilty Sleep': Freud's Wolf Man and Dreams of Castration in Melmoth the Wanderer," Linda Jones (2000), examines the scene in which young Maurice awakens from a nightmare, finds his father in the act of strangling his children to prevent them from starving to death, and says, "I dreamed a wolf was .
Further, the Big Telly Theatre Company's 2012 production and tour of a dramatic adaptation of Melmoth the Wanderer points to Maturin's nascent popular appeal.
Charles Maturin (1780-1824), the Irish author and Anglican clergyman, is nowadays remembered chiefly for Melmoth the Wanderer (1820), a vast Gothic labyrinth through which readers end up wandering too, at times disoriented, but more often enthralled by numerous encounters with what one of the novel's multiple narrators terms 'incarcerated minds'.
The work presents a discussion of Maturin's major works including The Wild Irish Boy, The Milesian Chief and his most famous work Melmoth the Wanderer.
as they differ from the heterosexual norm, focusing especially on Maturin's Melmoth the Wanderer (1820), Le Fanu's Carmilla (1872), Stevenson's Dr.
One thinks, early in the century, of Charles Maturin's Melmoth the Wanderer and Matthew Gregory Lewis's The Monk, midcentury of Sheridan LeFanu's tales, and at the fin de siecle of Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray and the grand denouement of the period's Gothic expression, Bram Stoker's Dracula.
Wilde emerged from jail a broken man and assumed the name Sebastian Melmoth, from the martyred saint and the hero of his great-uncle's novel Melmoth the Wanderer.
Students indicate that architecture further allows them to eyedentify more easily with Gothic fiction; and my class emphasizes different versions of the "Gothic gaze," which appears as the obsessive motif of "ocular demonstration" (Maturin 1961, 24) in Melmoth the Wanderer.
Sebastian, favourite early Christian martyr of the late nineteenth-century Uranians, with the hero of the 1820 Gothic novel Melmoth the Wanderer, by Charles Robert Maturin, who was actually Wilde's great-uncle -- were pretty nightmarish.