Melville

(redirected from Melvillean)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Melville

Herman. 1819--91, US novelist and short-story writer. Among his works, Moby Dick (1851) and Billy Budd (written 1891, published 1924) are outstanding

Melville

 

an island in the Timor Sea, off the northern coast of Australia. Area, about 6,200 sq km. Population, about 500. Elevation, to 258 m. The island is covered with mixed deciduous-evergreen monsoon forest.


Melville

 

an island in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (in the Queen Elizabeth Islands). Area, about 43,000 sq km. Com-posed of ancient crystalline rocks, the island has strongly dissected topography. Elevation, to 1,080 m. The shores are steep and deeply indented by gulfs and bays. The vegetation is that of the arctic desert. The island is uninhabited.


Melville

 

a peninsula in northern Canada between Foxe Basin in the east and Committee Bay in the west. The surface is a hilly peneplain on a crystalline foundation. Elevation, to 558 m. The vegetation is chiefly moss-lichen tundra. The Eskimo settlement of Repulse Bay is located in the south.

Figure 1. The form of certain natural frequencies of vibration of a membrane: (a) rectangular, (b) circular. The arrows indicate nodal lines; / and k are the numbers of the harmonics.


Melville

 

a bay of Baffin Bay, off the western coast of Green-land. Width at the entrance, about 300 km. Maximum depth, more than 1,000 m. The coast of one-third of the bay is formed by inland ice, from which numerous icebergs break off.

References in periodicals archive ?
An "Introduction" as concise as Hayes's obviously requires a high degree of selectivity, and other Melvilleans might conceivably make different choices than his.
If we take seriously Stoddard's claim (articulated in a later story) that much of what his characters know about South Seas island life is learned from Melville, we begin to see that at the moment when Stoddard is most formally (apostrophically) Whitmanian he is at least equal parts Melvillean.
However, the scenes in both novels, in their shared details, evoke a vision of the Inferno, and Wright, through a Melvillean parody, elevates the terror of a black man above the sensational and journalistic.
The Old Man and the Sea simply continues the Melvillean hunt for "the great principle of light," whether this be incarnated in the white whale or the marlin of "huge eye" (p.
Despite this Melvillean quarrel with Leverenz, I find his case engaging and compelling.