memetics

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memetics

(philosophy)
/me-met'iks/ The study of memes.

As of mid-1993, this is still an extremely informal and speculative endeavor, though the first steps toward at least statistical rigor have been made by H. Keith Henson and others. Memetics is a popular topic for speculation among hackers, who like to see themselves as the architects of the new information ecologies in which memes live and replicate.
References in periodicals archive ?
A memetic theory of the firm may contend that the intentions of all employees may not add up to something maximizing value.
Perhaps the more frightening prospect is for numerous brilliant scholars to invest their best efforts to apply memetic theory to subjects, such as culture and the mind, which are inherently non-amenable to such an approach, especially any totalizing or meta-narrative version of it.
However, even though Blackmore suggests ways to test memetic theory (to be discussed later in this article), the basic operational definition of memetics is seriously lacking or non-existent.
In an approach that not only pre-scinds from any teleology in nature as all Darwinism does, radical memetic theory also claims that the mind and cultures exist as fully dysreleological entities produced by non-teleological processes.
Thus, it is as if memetic theory almost asserts that memes are the immaterial soul of man, or as the previous paragraph implied, the "meme-devils" that commit murder but live on after the death of murderer and murdered.
Conversely, it may even be helpful to expand memetic theory so that within its methodology it can account for telos in culture and mind.
Finally, before moving to the next section, it is important to emphasize other ways memetic theory may also be overstrained by a pre-empirical metaphysical agenda, besides being positively guided by methodological naturalism.
Therefore, Blackmore's claim that memetic theory "neatly resolves the mystery of the human brain's vastness" is yet unhelpful as empirical science.
at 56 (arguing that all that matters for memetic theory is that a meme is replicated, not whether the meme consists of a few notes or a whole song).