Memling

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Memling

, Memlinc
Hans . ?1430--94, Flemish painter of religious works and portraits
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In late-Gothic Cologne, from his evident study of Lochner, and other painters who lack a name by which one may praise them, such as the spaciously tranquil Master of the Life of the Virgin, Memlinc learned that both beauty and beatitude are calm.
A view of a town much like Bruges wraps itself round the Jan Floreins Triptych and emerges as definitely Bruges in its right wing, where Memlinc envisages the presentation in the Temple as taking place in the organ-loft of St.
Whereas Jan van Eych was ducal painter to Philip of Burgundy, and a gentleman of his bedchamber, Memlinc eschewed both the violence and the ostentation of the overlords of Flanders.
Memlinc settled among the merchants in the commercial northern quarter of Bruges, not among the courtiers in the centre of the town.
At this time Memlinc painted his one wholly tragic picture, the Lubeck Crucifixion of 1491.
How Sir John met Memlinc, and why he asked the little-known artist to paint for him what proved to be one of Memlinc's supreme works, one cannot say, unless the dominance in the Donne Triptych of the two Saints John provides a clue, patron saints as they were of both Johannes Memlinc and Sir John and also of a hospital founded in a world of distress.
The grabbing of the bunch of pages is a typically baby-like action which Memlinc must have observed, and replicates in his Virgin and Child with St.
Like Jan van Eyck, Memlinc brings the donor out of the usual corner into the centre of the picture, so that the donor seems almost to join in the sacred conversation.
Still closer to Memlinc was the merchant grocer, Jacob Floreins, since he had painted one of his earliest works for his brother Jan, and both brothers were officers of the Hospital of St.
Memlinc probably esteemed nobody among his chosen citizens of Bruges more highly than Willem Moreel, a merchant grocer and an opponent of Maximilian, who imprisoned him in 1481.
What share Memlinc had in the design of the reliquary, which is like a tiny fifteenth-century chapel, we do not know, but it certainly presented him with problems, gladly undertaken and gleefully resolved.