memoir

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memoir

1. a biography or historical account, esp one based on personal knowledge
2. an essay or monograph, as on a specialized topic
3. Obsolete a memorandum
References in periodicals archive ?
Dorit Sasson is the creator of Giving Voice to Your Courage podcast and website, story mentor, memoirist of Accidental Soldier: A Memoir of Service and Sacrifice in the Israel Defense Forces.
Pretty much all the great memoirists I've met," she writes, "sound on the page like they do in person.
In the end, both memoirists are correct: Basic training is an abstraction that leads to death.
With few exceptions, the memoirists present certain standard discussions: an idealization of the father, a criticism of the mother, a nod to a lost childhood, a critique of the marriage process, a presentation of her social world, to name a few.
In her new book memoirist Sue William Silverman author of Love Sick: One Woman's Journey Through Sexual Addiction and Because I Remember Terror Father I Remember You taps into this trend providing practical advice for writers ready to put the most intimate details of their lives into print.
It was the careful packaging of both book and author by an army of experts, and the public exposure of the mechanics of that process, that put her into a recent rogues gallery that so far includes a defense industry CEO who stole from an old book, a putative memoirist who was just making stuff up, and, most amusing of all, an author who doesn't even exist.
Although Vansant acknowledges the gulf dividing Amery's total despair from the essentially hopeful stance of her memoirists (return is, in their cases, an expression of hope), she uses his extreme conclusions to understand at least some of what her own memoirists faced.
Both these memoirists bring to their front-line experiences an education only reading the great works of literature can give.
Those earlier scholars produced an image of the unconventional female memoirists as untrustworthy and immoral, an image that incorporated their own values and often reflected those of eighteenth-century moralists.
Still, these memoirists hew, albeit with hopeless ineptitude, to the prevailing strategies and forms.
A culturally constructed language of femininity, be it the figure of romantic heroine, of the hysterically jealous wife in the polygynous marriage, or a hyperbolic show of religiosity as a means of self-determination, controls the construction of Self for the both memoirists.