Manasseh

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Manasseh

(mənăs`ē) [Heb.,=making to forget], in the Bible. 1 First son of JosephJoseph,
one of the heroes of the patriarchal narratives of the Book of Genesis. He is presented as the favored son of Jacob and Rachel, sold as a boy into slavery by his brothers, who were jealous of Joseph's dreams and of his coat of many colors given him by Jacob.
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 by his Egyptian wife, Asenath, and eponymous ancestor of one of the 12 tribes of Israel. Manasseh received land on both sides of the Jordan River. In Palestine his tribe occupied the land just S of the Vale of Jezreel; on the other side, Manasseh received land E of Gad.

2 King of JudahJudah,
in the Bible, the southern of the two kingdoms remaining after the division of the kingdom of the Jews that occurred under Rehoboam. The northern kingdom, Israel, was continually at war with Judah.
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 (c.687–642 B.C.), son and successor of HezekiahHezekiah
, in the Bible, king of Judah, son and successor of Ahaz. During his reign Sennacherib of Assyria routed (701 B.C.) the rebellious Jews, laid seige to Jerusalem, and exacted a high indemnity from them.
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. Under Manasseh, Judah reached a low point of moral and spiritual degradation. The Jewish Prayer of Manasseh, included in the Old Testament ApocryphaApocrypha
[Gr.,=hidden things], term signifying a collection of early Jewish writings excluded from the canon of the Hebrew scriptures. It is not clear why the term was chosen.
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 of the Authorized Version and the New Revised Standard Version, is a penitential psalm, purporting to be the king's prayer in captivity.

Manasseh

idolatrously and murderously leads Jerusalem astray. [O.T.: II Kings 21:2–4, 9]

Manasseh

Old Testament
1. the elder son of Joseph (Genesis 41:51)
2. the Israelite tribe descended from him
3. the territory of this tribe, in the upper Jordan valley
References in periodicals archive ?
Menasseh ben Israel, Nishmat Hayyim (New York: Sinai Offset Co.
Despite the missionary motivations of those Christians, several prominent rabbis, including Rabbi Menasseh ben Israel, maintained friendly and cooperative relationships with them on the conviction that there was a confluence of millennialist and messianic expectation between them.
In 1650, roughly one year before the date identified by Columbus as the culmination of history, Dutch-Jewish philosopher Menasseh ben Israel penned his own arguments asserting "that the first inhabitants of America were the Ten Tribes of the Israelites.
She waited till he was standing in prayer, and then said in a tone of wonder, 'Joseph is in Egypt/ There have been born on his knees/ Menasseh and Ephraim.
Director of the Menasseh ben Israel Institute for Jewish social and cultural studies in Amsterdam, Wertheim argues that Jews in Germany just after World War I longed for salvation, and to find it turned to their renegade ancestor Benedictus de Spinoza (1632-77).
Claro esta que esta no fue la interpretracion que le dio Menasseh ben Israel al soprendente testimonio de Montezinos.
There is an entire chapter (6) devoted to information concerning the High Priest from the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, English accounts of these sources, the Apocrypha, and contemporary materials relevant to the problem, including the life and work of Menasseh ben Israel, John Dury, John Reeve, Lodowick Muggleton, John Robins, and others.
It was Cromwell who re-admitted Jews, in response to a pamphlet written by Rabbi Menasseh Ben Israel.
The author's chosen methodology is highly effective and creates some original insights regarding Rembrandt's Jewish patrons (Samuel D'Orta, Gaspar Duente, and the d'Acosta Curiel family) and especially the artist's relationship with the distinguished theologian Menasseh Ben Israel, for whom the artist completed his only full series of book illustrations, The Piedra Gloriosa o De la Estatua de Nebuchadnezar (1655, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam).
Rembrandt's relationship with Rabbi Menasseh ben Israel, which resulted in (among other things) the Aramaic-Hebrew inscription in Belshezzar's feast (National Gallery, London), is examined in depth.
In the early to mid 1650s, the Amsterdam rabbi Menasseh ben Israel, with the support of John Dury, tried to convince Oliver Cromwell to permit the Jews to return to England, from which they had been banished in 1290 by order of Edward I.
Later, when Jacob is blessing Joseph's sons, Menasseh and Ephraim, Joseph insists that his father place his right hand over Menasseh, as the first born, and not switch his hands as he was about to do.