Mendele mocher sforim

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Mendele mocher sforim

[Yid.,= Mendele the book peddler] (mĕn`dələ môkh`ər sfô`rĭm), pseud. of

Sholem Yakov Abramovich

(shō`ləm yä`kôv əbrämə`vĭch), 1836–1917, Yiddish novelist. Born in Minsk, and orphaned at 14, he traveled with beggars through Ukraine. His early writings were in Hebrew, but his later novels and short stories were written in Yiddish. He perfected a Yiddish prose style that greatly influenced later writers. Mendele translated many of his later works into Hebrew. Among his best-known writings, dealing with Jewish life in Russia, are Di kliatche [the mare] (1873) and The Travels of Benjamin the Third (1878). Strongly influenced by the secularizing trends of the Hebrew Enlightenment, or Haskalah, he attempted to influence the people to free themselves from the physical and intellectual restraints of the ghetto. He is considered the grandfather of modern Yiddish literature and the father of modern Hebrew literature.

Bibliography

See studies by D. Miron (1973) and T. L. Steinberg (1977).

References in periodicals archive ?
These definitions enabled the judges to select books from a field of brilliant authors, ranging from the grandfather of Yiddish literature, Mendele Moykher Sforim, to contemporary masters such as Saul Bellow, Cynthia Ozick, and Philip Roth.
The literary games in which they engaged, and the narrative strategies derived from a cunning exploitation of intertextuality they developed, were so innovative that they challenged all who read them: Dik's influence is writ large all over subsequent Yiddish fiction from Mendele Moykher Sforim to Isaac Bashevis Singer.