minuet

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minuet

(mĭnyo͞oĕt`), French dance, originally from Poitou, introduced at the court of Louis XIV in 1650. It became popular during the 17th and 18th cent. In 3–4 meter and moderate tempo, the minuet was performed by open couples who made graceful and precise glides and steps. The minuet left a refined but definite imprint on music; it is found in the operatic sinfonias of Alessandro Scarlatti and appears frequently as a movement in the symphonies and sonatas of Haydn and Mozart.

Minuet

 

a French dance, which developed from a folk dance from the province of Poitou. The minuet became a courtly dance in the second half of the 17th century and then spread throughout Europe as a ballroom dance (in Russia, it was introduced by Peter I). It is marked by smooth, majestic movements, consisting primarily of bows and curtsies. The dance is in 3/4 time. In the 18th century the minuet acquired variations: the tempo was quickened, movements became more complicated, and the dance took on affected features.

Early examples of minuets appear in J. B. Lully’s ballets for operas, F. Couperin’s clavier music, G. F. Handel’s overtures to oratorios, and Handel’s and J. S. Bach’s orchestral and instrumental suites. Mozart gave the minuet exuberance and vitality. Gradually it was transformed into the scherzo (for example, in works by Beethoven). The minuet is rarely encountered in works from the late 19th century and early 20th (Debussy, Ravel, Fauré, Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev).

S. P. PANKRATOV

minuet

1. a stately court dance of the 17th and 18th centuries in triple time
2. a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance, sometimes as a movement in a suite, sonata, or symphony

Minuet

(networking)
References in periodicals archive ?
The "C" theme in the subdominant key (the menuetto is in true rondo form) incorporates the neighbor-tone motive in a fashion similar to that of the lyrical theme of the rondo of the first sonata but with a change in metrical inflection (3/4 instead of 6/8).
I was among those who liked Menuetto for its ease and liquidity, and I wasn't put off by its lack of drama.
xv) of the verse in Plattdeutsch that Schumann wrote into her autograph of the arrangement of the Menuetto I/II from the First Serenade (presumably at the time she wrote out the manuscript) opens a fresh perspective on her view of Brahms's music that may reward further investigation.
It is not implausible that subjective impulses may sometimes have led composers to write larger and bolder staccato marks where they envisaged a forceful delivery and smaller ones where they imagined a gentler expression (this may have something to do with the form of the staccato marks in the Menuetto of K575), but that is something utterly different from the employment of two quite distinct signs with quite distinct meanings.
With respect to Beethoven, Neumann points out that the two metronomized instances of a Tempo di Menuetto by Beethoven are crotchet = 116 (Septet) and 126 (Symphony no.
It was also a well-considered interpretation packed with satisfying contrast (between a stately opening Largo and especially brisk second movement, for example), conveying refinement without sacrificing colour - the bright second Menuetto and exuberant final Rondo were memorably well-judged.
Some editorial comment was called for here, as indeed it is in the case of the final movement, a rondo that alternates Allegretto [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] sections with a Menuetto in [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]: Gabler might have suggested a likely tempo relationship between the two types of material.
This evening's vigorous menuetto was apparently not meant for dancing, with scant time to catch one's breath after the trio.
Unflashy virtuosity here graced subsequent movements, too, as in melting rubato from the strings in the Menuetto, and in the evocative offstage extended posthorn solo.
Franz Schubert Samtliche Klaviersonaten Band 1: Sonaten D 157, 279, 459, 537, 557, 566, 567, 568, Fragment D 154, Menuetto D 277A.
Even the tongue-in-cheek humour of the menuetto seemed thrown away, though these fine players did come into their own with a delicately balanced, poised reading of the sublime andante.
First, he notes the thematic influence of the song on the first movement and the chorus of the third, but entirely neglects its equally strong influence on the Tempo di Menuetto, which would strengthen his case.