Mercator projection


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Related to Mercator projection: Transverse Mercator projection

Mercator projection

an orthomorphic map projection on which parallels and meridians form a rectangular grid, scale being exaggerated with increasing distance from the equator

Mercator Projection

 

one of the cartographic projections. The Mercator projection is equiangular and cylindrical. In this projection all the loxodromes—lines on a sphere intersecting all meridians at the same angle—are represented as straight lines inclined at the same angle to the meridians. The projection is widely used in making marine and aeronautical charts, and it is also often used in oblique orientation. The projection was developed and first employed by G. Mercator in 1569.

Mercator projection

[mər′kād·ər prə‚jek·shən]
(mapping)
A conformal cylindrical map projection in which the surface of a sphere or spheroid, such as the earth, is conceived as developed on a cylinder tangent along the Equator; meridians appear as equally spaced vertical lines, and parallels as horizontal lines drawn farther apart as the latitude increases, such that the correct relationship between latitude and longitude scales at any point is maintained.
References in periodicals archive ?
Groud Control Using Space Oblique Mercator Projection Theory.
Projecting time: John Parr Snyder and the development of the space oblique Mercator projection.
Application of space oblique Mercator projection in remote sensing.
Infamous for making Greenland look huge, the Mercator projection benefits Europe because that continent lies more than halfway to the North Pole; the equator-straddling continent of Africa gets short-changed.
Although different projections have since come into fashion, Saarinen reasons that many of the older Mercator projection maps still cover the walls of classrooms around the world, quitely passing on an incorrect view of the continents to students.
The conformal property of the Mercator projection makes the direct reading of azimuth angles quite easy.
Mercator: In use since the 1500s, the Mercator projection is popular with sailors.
In the Mercator projection, what happens to landmasses that are far from the equator?