Jones Act

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Jones Act

 

a measure adopted by the United States Congress on Aug. 29, 1916; the author was Senator W. Jones. The act provided for the formation in the Philippines of an elected bicameral legislative assembly. The American governor-general retained executive power and the right to veto laws. According to the Jones Act the Philippines were promised independence after a “stable government” was established. In 1934 the Tydings-McDuffie Act was adopted, according to which the Philippines were given autonomy and promised independence after a ten-year “transitional period.”

PUBLICATION

“The Philippine Autonomy Act (Jones Law).” Encyclopedia of the Philippines, vol. 6. Manila, 1935. Pages 146-70.
References in periodicals archive ?
In compliance with the Merchant Marine Act of 1920, also known as the Jones Act, R+L Carriers serves as a trusted freight shipper between these many offshore ports.
A number of media sources and conservative Republicans began reporting that the [section] 27 of the Merchant Marine Act of 1920, (10) known as the Jones Act, hampered the cleanup efforts.
A number of Federal workers' compensation and related laws are briefly reviewed in Lencsis' book, including the Federal Employers' Liability Act, the Merchant Marine Act of 1920, Death on the High Seas Act, and General Maritime Law, the United States Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act, Extensions of the United States Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act, the Federal Employees Compensation Act, the District of Columbia Workers' Compensation Law, the Federal Black Lung Program, and Social Security and medicare.

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