meridian

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Meridian

(mərĭd`ēən), city (1990 pop. 41,036), seat of Lauderdale co., E Miss., near the Ala. line; settled 1831, inc. 1860. It is an important rail and highway point and the trade and shipping center for a farm, livestock, and timber area. There is also diverse manufacturing. In the Civil War, Meridian was the temporary capital of Mississippi (1863); it was destroyed by General Sherman in Feb., 1864. Meridian Naval Air Station is to the north. Nearby Okatibbee Reservoir offers recreational activities.

meridian

(mĕ-rid -ee-ăn)
1. An imaginary great circle passing through a point on the surface of a body, such as a planet or satellite, at right angles to the equator and passing through the north and south poles.
2. Short for celestial meridian. The projection of the observer's terrestrial meridian on the celestial sphere. It is thus the great circle passing through the north and south celestial poles and the observer's zenith and intersecting the observer's horizon at the north and south points (see cardinal points).

Meridian

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A meridian (from the Latin word for “midday”) is formed by taking a line of longitude and projecting it outward from Earth onto the celestial sphere. Another way of imagining a meridian is to picture the circle that would be formed by drawing a line connecting the north pole, the zenith (the point in the sky directly overhead), the south pole, and the nadir (the point directly opposite the zenith).

meridian

[mə′rid·ē·ən]
(astronomy)
A great circle passing through the poles of the axis of rotation of a planet or satellite.
(geodesy)
A north-south reference line, particularly a great circle through the geographical poles of the earth.

meridian

meridian
A semi—great circle joining the geographical poles. All meridians indicate a north-south direction. Every great circle joining the poles forms a meridian and its antimeridian.

meridian

1. 
a. one of the imaginary lines joining the north and south poles at right angles to the equator, designated by degrees of longitude from 0? at Greenwich to 180?
b. the great circle running through both poles
2. Astronomy
a. the great circle on the celestial sphere passing through the north and south celestial poles and the zenith and nadir of the observer
b. (as modifier): a meridian instrument
3. Maths a section of a surface of revolution, such as a paraboloid, that contains the axis of revolution
4. (in acupuncture, etc.) any of the channels through which vital energy is believed to circulate round the body
5. Obsolete noon
6. along or relating to a meridian
References in classic literature ?
One evening I was passing through this room to my bedroom, with a lamp--there is no gas in Meridian.
One of these jets extended as far as the circle of Neander, situated on the 40th meridian.
I cannot help promising myself, from such a dawn, that the meridian of this youth will be equal to that of either the elder or the younger Brutus.
It is nearly of the second magnitude, and its meridian passage is--"
And just as the conclusions of the astronomers would have been vain and uncertain if not founded on observations of the seen heavens, in relation to a single meridian and a single horizon, so would my conclusions be vain and uncertain if not founded on that conception of right, which has been and will be always alike for all men, which has been revealed to me as a Christian, and which can always be trusted in my soul.
Yes," he continued, with a contemptuous smile, "the blowing up of the first meridian is bound to raise a howl of execration.
I am abroad at night, my good girl, because the earth in its diurnal revolutions leaves the light of the sun but half the time on any given meridian, and because what I have to do cannot be performed in twelve or fifteen consecutive hours.