Merneptah


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Merneptah

(mĕrnĕp`tä), d. c.1215 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XIX dynasty; son and successor of Ramses IIRamses II
, Rameses II,
or Ramesses II
, d. 1225 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XIX dynasty. The son of Seti I, Ramses was not the heir to the throne but usurped it from his brother. He reigned for 67 years (1292–1225 B.C.).
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. He succeeded (1224 B.C.) to the throne when he was already advanced in years. He quelled a revolt in Syria and repulsed a Libyan invasion of the western delta of the Nile. The first recorded mention of the name of Israel was found in an inscription on a stele of Merneptah exulting in a victory. His reign was apparently the beginning of the decline of Egypt. After his death a period of palace intrigues began. Seti IISeti II
, d. 1205 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XIX dynasty. He was one of the kings who reigned briefly after Merneptah, and seems to have ruled for about four years. After his reign anarchy set in for a few years until the accession of Ramses III.
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 was one of the kings who reigned briefly after Merneptah.
References in periodicals archive ?
Part of this chapter is devoted to a discussion of ethnogenesis and the Merneptah stele, although it is unclear how this material influences Pfoh's reading of the data relating to the house of Omri.
After the death of Ramses II, his thirteenth son Merneptah ruled briefly, as all his elder brothers had died.
After causing havoc in Mycenaean Greece, they reached the Nile Delta and attacked Egypt, first in the days of Rameses II (1278 BCE) and then during the reign of Pharaoh Merneptah, who slaughtered thousands of them in a sixhour battle (c.
A final issue concerns the Merneptah stele, which Fritz discusses in section two as a critical source.
Topics include border delineation and the setting of boundary stellae during the Egyptian Middle Kingdom, Egyptian-Canaanite relations in the Second Intermediate Period as reflected by scarabs, relations between Amenhotep II and the Kingdom of Mitanni, archaeological findings at a settlement of the Sherden dated to the reign of Rameses III, parallelism between the biblical passage II Samuel 22 and the Israel Stela of Merneptah, Egyptian influence behind the names of Immanuel in the biblical book of Isaiah, Egyptian influence on the Southern Levant and the Kingdom of Judah during the 26th Dynasty, and the role of civil servants who participated in Egyptian military campaigns.
It aims at lowering the underground water level below the temples of King Seti I, Ramesseum, Merneptah, Amenhotep III, Hapo City, and the remains of funeral temples built by Thotmos III and King Hormoheb," said Mansour Breik, the head of Upper Egypt Antiquities.
This stele commemorates the pharaoh Merneptah, the son and successor of Ramses II.
This discovery--which caused a sensation in the press--proved to be the objects that Carter had not included in the list drawn up for sale to the Metropolitan, among them works of considerable beauty and interest, ranging from a large alabaster vessel from the tomb of Merneptah, son of Ramesses II (Fig.
The first time outside the Bible that the Israelites are identified as a distinct people is in the monument commissioned by the Pharaoh Merneptah in 1209 BCE.
The small tufts of brown hair were displayed alongside pieces of linen bandages and 11 pieces of resin used in the mummification of Ramses and his son Merneptah in a glass display case.
Roedd cael dilyn troed Howard Carter, ac yn ddiweddarach George Herbert, sef pumed Arglwydd Caernarfon i lawr y coridorau ac i'r gwahanol siambrau, yn cyflyru rhywun i gael gwybod llawer iawn mwy am eu gwaith diflino, wrth chwilio am feddrodau brenhinoedd ar ochor Orllewinol y Nil, Luxor a Dyffryn y Brenhinoedd - Rameses, Merneptah, Seti, Tuthumosis a heb os y darganfyddiad syfrdanol yn ystod Tachwedd 1922, sef beddrod Tutankamun.
A final chapter on "ethnicity" justifies Israel's claim to reoccupy the territory thus named at least since Merneptah, not stressing the earlier-mentioned "politicized" demand for a dug-up history of the Palestinians (the Philistine southwest corner gave the name only in Roman times).