Merope


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Merope

(mĕr`əpē), in Greek mythology. 1 One of the Pleiades. She was the wife of Sisyphus, king of Corinth, and the mother of Glaucus. According to one legend she became the lost Pleiad because of the shame she felt for having married a mortal. 2 Daughter of Oenopion. Orion loved her, but when he failed to gain her father's approval, he raped her. In revenge, Oenopion blinded him.

Merope

(me -roh-pee) See Pleiades.
References in periodicals archive ?
Time has passed in the world outside the mythosphere, the world in which Hayley keeps the photograph in her room in modern-day London, and it is made quite clear that the Merope and Sisyphus Hayley eventually meets are the same ones who got married in Greece thousands of years ago.
Freedom of action seems to mean, often, that people are free to do what they are meant to do: Troy can build his city, a city that will be ravaged and burnt; Sisyphus and Merope can return to Cyprus, but to what end?
Merope tuber collected in Florida are deposited in the FSCA, Gainesville, Florida.
We report Merope tuber Newman from Florida for the first time.
D'AGNILLO, Renzo, 'Desmond Egan: A Poet With No Illusions', in Merope, X, 23, Gennaio 1998, pp.
Some people claim to have seen the ghostly glow of this dust cloud near Merope.
It is a commonplace that his most powerful and effective poems deal with personal situations in contemporary time, and that when he tried in Merope (1856-1858) to write as he advocated in the 1853 Preface, he chose a lost Euripidean subject to treat in a Sophoclean tone, and could not achieve the "serious cheerfulness" that was his aim, only a muddle of Greek plot events and characters on which he imposed Victorian adaptations, which usually were in the form of psychological crises.
Tre le donne altere, forti, inermi, pure del teatro settecentesco vengono scelti quattro miti: Merope che incarna la madre, Rosmunda che raffigura la matrigna, Clitennestra e Alcesti per la moglie/amante.
In this essay, published during his lifetime only when the poem first appeared in 1855(CPW 1:229), Arnold announces his long attraction to the subject of Merope and then proceeds to create a "play of text with quotation and of quotations with one another," which is reminiscent of the strophes, antistrophes, and epodes in the choric poetry he is applauding.
xi), which the plot illustrates--progressively of course--through Orion's frustrated courtship of Artemis (a goddess fond but chaste), his interrupted amours with Merope (a princess ardent but politically off-limits), and ecstatic union with Eos (goddess of dawn and thus patroness of potentiality itself, proof divine that, as the poem's oftenest-quoted slogan puts it, "'T is always morning somewhere in the world," 3.
The two dramatic poems are Merope--appearing for the first time since 1858, when it was published as a separate volume--and, after it, Empedocles on Etna, the poem that had precipitated Arnold's revulsion against the "dialogue of the mind with itself," which in turn had led to his attempt at Sophoclean drama in Merope.
Those looking for greater correspondence between the dictates of the "Preface" and an Arnoldian poetic pe rformance would be advised to look forward in Arnold's career to Balder Dead and Merope.