Mesopotamian architecture

Mesopotamian architecture

(3000–500 B.C.)
A massive architecture constructed of mud-bricks set with clay mortar; producing heavy walls articulated by pilasters and recesses and faced with glazed brick. Columns were seldom used, and openings were infrequent and small.

Mesopotamian architecture

Architecture developed by the Euphrates and Tigris Valley civilizations, from the 3rd millennium to the 6th cent. B.C. Primarily a massive architecture of mud bricks set in clay mortar or bitumen. The heavy walls were articulated by pilasters and recesses; important public buildings were faced with baked or glazed brick. Rooms were narrow and long and generally covered by timber and mud roofs, but in certain cases also by tunnel vaults; columns were seldom used; openings usually were small.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the fourth edition of a work first published in 1986 under the Barrie & Jenkins imprint, and contains much new material on Ancient Egyptian and Mesopotamian architecture where, as Watkin points out, the roots of Western architecture can be perceived (something ignorant media seem not to have grasped): an expanded account of architecture since the 1930s brings the book up to date.
Nevertheless, Schmid's vast store of knowledge concerning the details of Mesopotamian architecture and his careful presentation ensure the importance of this contribution for a long time to come.