TPN

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Related to Metabolic defects: Birth defects, Inborn errors of metabolism

TPN,

in biochemistry, abbreviation for triphosphopyridine nucleotide, a coenzymecoenzyme
, any one of a group of relatively small organic molecules required for the catalytic function of certain enzymes. A coenzyme may either be attached by covalent bonds to a particular enzyme or exist freely in solution, but in either case it participates intimately in
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 now usually called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, or NADP.

TPN

References in periodicals archive ?
Secondary metabolic defects in spinal muscular atrophy type II.
It appears likely, therefore, that the 5-oxoprolinuria demonstrated in our patient was attributable to a metabolic defect at some stage in the [gamma]-glutamyl cycle and that this resulted in the biochemical and clinical findings.
The two medications, when used in combination, target core metabolic defects to help achieve better blood sugar control than metformin alone, making this an important option for patients with type 2 diabetes.
AntiCancer, founded in 1984 and based in San Diego, is developing new drugs for cancer based on genetic engineering, which target cancer-specific metabolic defects.
It is in a class of inherited metabolic defects called lysosomal storage disorders and results in the gradual destruction of myelin, a fatty substance that surrounds and protects nerve fibers.
Our approach is to correct metabolic defects in the human body by replacing key regulatory molecules in a physiologically relevant fashion.
Combining two medications that address different metabolic defects in type 2 diabetes provides a powerful therapeutic option that may ultimately help to reduce long-term complications of the disease.
This approach allows us, for the first time, to simultaneously treat both of the two major metabolic defects that are known to cause type 2 diabetes.
AntiCancer, founded in 1984 and based in San Diego, is also developing new drugs for cancer based on genetic engineering, targeting cancer specific metabolic defects.
This animal develops metabolic defects in a manner similar to humans, with a broad spectrum of glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and obesity providing an ideal model to uncover new genes and pathways involved in obesity and diabetes development.
AntiCancer, based in San Diego, is also developing new drugs for cancer based on genetic engineering, targeting cancer specific metabolic defects.