Metaphysical Painting

Metaphysical Painting

 

a tendency in Italian painting that was prevalent from around 1915 to the early 1920’s. Its exponents (the founder G. de Chirico, C. Carrà, F. de Pisis, M. Campigli, F. Casorati, G. Morandi), who were connected with the magazine Valori Plastici (1919–22), shared to a large extent the general tendencies of neoclassicism of the 1920’s. They sought to express the depressing emptiness and frightening coldness of a world estranged from man and to reveal a kind of secret, magical meaning in the arrangement of unrelated objects.

REFERENCES

Carra, C. Pittura metafisica. Florence [1919].
Apollonio, U. Pittura metafisica. Venice, 1950.
References in periodicals archive ?
Morandi was a Futurist for a short period, and then, together with Giorgio de Chirico and Carlo Carra, was associated with the metaphysical painting movement (pittura metafisica).
One recurrent reference is the metaphysical painting of Alberto Savinio and Giorgio de Chirico, referred to in four paintings on canvas: the densely colored Ara Ara Ara, Stream of Thoughts, and Mindfulness of Emotions, and the vivid Cosmic Joke.
Wieland Schmied, "De Chirico, Metaphysical Painting and the International Avant-Garde: Twelve Theses," in Italian Art in the Twentieth Century, 1900-1988, ed.
Hassan Khan: Is there a place for metaphysical painting in today's culture?
Despite his apparently detached stance, the artist acts in maieutic fashion, "drawing out" rebellion against the system through play; just as in Metaphysical Painting or Surrealism, when the object becomes paradoxical, one finally sees it for what it is.
There turns out to be no dramatic moment of conversion in Gottlieb's career, no definitive point where he leaves behind metaphysical painting and arrives at Abstract Expressionism.
When he saw the metaphysical paintings of Giorgio de Chirico and a Surrealist show in Brussels in 1934 (which included his colleague, Rene Magritte), the young Delvaux promptly changed course and began painting his dreams with abandonment.
Typical of de Chirico's early metaphysical paintings, this composition contains a tower, an arcade, strong contrasting colors and shadows, and a sense of disturbing quiet that are iconic to his work.
The vision of those ruins is very apt to share the feeling evoked in metaphysical paintings.
De Chirico created metaphysical paintings that included representational imagery that was often bizarre and incongruous, a prelude to Surrealism.
The triangles and T squares of Giorgio de Chirico's metaphysical paintings are their forebears, and they signal a revived introspection spurred by the Second World War.