Metaphysical Painting

Metaphysical Painting

 

a tendency in Italian painting that was prevalent from around 1915 to the early 1920’s. Its exponents (the founder G. de Chirico, C. Carrà, F. de Pisis, M. Campigli, F. Casorati, G. Morandi), who were connected with the magazine Valori Plastici (1919–22), shared to a large extent the general tendencies of neoclassicism of the 1920’s. They sought to express the depressing emptiness and frightening coldness of a world estranged from man and to reveal a kind of secret, magical meaning in the arrangement of unrelated objects.

REFERENCES

Carra, C. Pittura metafisica. Florence [1919].
Apollonio, U. Pittura metafisica. Venice, 1950.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hassan Khan: Is there a place for metaphysical painting in today's culture?
How can the transcendent metaphysical painting act as a return to the body?
Chirico's rejection of modernism, did not mean that he abandoned his metaphysical painting.
A metaphysical painting by Chirico hangs on one wall, a small window opens on to a classical landscape on the other.
Despite his apparently detached stance, the artist acts in maieutic fashion, "drawing out" rebellion against the system through play; just as in Metaphysical Painting or Surrealism, when the object becomes paradoxical, one finally sees it for what it is.
There turns out to be no dramatic moment of conversion in Gottlieb's career, no definitive point where he leaves behind metaphysical painting and arrives at Abstract Expressionism.
Typical of de Chirico's early metaphysical paintings, this composition contains a tower, an arcade, strong contrasting colors and shadows, and a sense of disturbing quiet that are iconic to his work.
The vision of those ruins is very apt to share the feeling evoked in metaphysical paintings.
Among those singled out were the Metaphysical paintings by de Chirico, the expressionist work Chaos (1936) by Renato Birolli (1905-59), who had been briefly arrested in 1937.
The works he made during the first few years of this period, known as his metaphysical paintings, greatly influenced a group of young artists whose work would come to be known as Surrealism.
Anna Boghiguian: There are painters I like, but I am not sure you can call them influences, I like metaphysical paintings of Gustave Moreau, I also like Louise Bourgeois, certain Picasso drawings, David Hockney.
Set by Bronstein in a strangely abandoned piazza that recalls the disquieting metaphysical paintings of Giorgio de Chirico, this discordant scene evoked cliched touristic views and their definition of a city's image, resembling a souvenir from some imaginary eighteenth-century Grand Tour.