Metcalfe's law

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Metcalfe's law

"The value of a network increases exponentially with the number of nodes," coined by Bob Metcalfe, founder of 3Com Corporation and major designer of Ethernet. A network becomes more useful as more users are connected. A primary example is the Internet. It fostered global e-mail, which became more valuable as more users adopted it. See laws.
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How might such concepts as open source, Moore's Law, and Metcalf's Law, and the ability to deliver voice, video and other media via the Internet further effect business and policy?
Metcalf's Law states that the power of a network is proportional to the square of the number of nodes in the network; the number of DoD TechMatch nodes is growing rapidly.
We, however, begin to appreciate the benefits of Metcalf's Law, as broadband penetration snowballs and opens the door for an unprecedented surge in creativity and uptake of new Internet applications.
Social media is based on various forms of network theory, including Sarnoff's Law, Metcalf's Law and Reed's Law, which describe the effect of networks and allow us to understand the impact of what is often referred to as Web 2.
According to Metcalf's Law, if you add 4 nodes (or in this case solutions) to a network, it would become valued at 4 squared or 16.