Eugenol

(redirected from Methyleugenol)
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eugenol

[′yü·jə‚nȯl]
(organic chemistry)
CH2CHCH2C6H3(OCH3)OH A colorless or yellowish aromatic liquid with spicy odor and taste, soluble in organic solvents, and extracted from clove oil; used in flavors, perfumes, medicines, and the manufacture of vanilla.

Eugenol

 

(also 4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol), a yellowish liquid having the structural formula

Eugenol has the odor of cloves. It is soluble in alcohol and ether and slightly soluble in water. It has a melting point of 10.3°C, a boiling point of 252.7°C, and a density of 1.066 g/cm3 at 20°C. Eugenol is extracted from essential oils, including clove oil, which has a eugenol content of up to 95 percent, and the oil of East Indian basil, which is approximately 70 percent eugenol. It can be synthesized from such compounds as guaiacol.

Eugenol is used as an aromatic substance in the manufacture of perfumes and vanillin.

References in periodicals archive ?
Suppression of L-histidine decarboxylase mRNA expression by methyleugenol.
The target compounds for GC analysis were [alpha]-pinene, camphene, [beta]-pinene, myrcene, limonene, 4-allylanisole, methyleugenol, borneol, and fenchyl alcohol.
The reviews describe the toxic and pathological aspects of methyleugenol, methyl mercury, uranium, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), cholesterol oxidation products, and neutraceuticals.
These extended 72-hour studies of the fate of six chemicals (retinal, musk xylol, methyleugenol, catechol, diethanolamine and disperse blue 1).
beta]-Asarone, geranylacetate, methyleugenol, cismethylisoeugenol, [beta]-farnesene, shyobunone, epishyobunone and isoshyobunone are abundantly present in the essential oil.
Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Methyleugenol (CAS no.
Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of methyleugenol and related congeners--a mechanism of activation for methyleugenol.
Methyleugenol was found to be a very potent multisite carcinogen in male and female F344/N rats and B6C3[F.
In its meeting on 2-3 February 2004, the working party finalised recommendations concerning the use of herbal medicinal products containing methyleugenol and estragole after review of comments which had been submitted by interested parties.
Whether you intend to or not, chances are you will consume approximately 6 micrograms of methyleugenol (ME) today, according to a report in this month's issue by Dana B.