Chivalric Romance

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Chivalric Romance

 

an epic genre of courtly literature that poeticized knighthood in the figures of such heroes as King Arthur, Lancelot, Tristan, and Amadís. The chivalric romance poeticized the exploits of knights, performed in the name of glory, love, and moral perfection. The genre’s authors included Chrétien de Troyes, Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, and Thomas Malory (England).

References in classic literature ?
There must have been a Norman original of the Scottish metrical romance of Rauf Colziar, in which Charlemagne is introduced as the unknown guest of a charcoal-man.
Yet Horace Walpole wrote a goblin tale which has thrilled through many a bosom; and George Ellis could transfer all the playful fascination of a humour, as delightful as it was uncommon, into his Abridgement of the Ancient Metrical Romances.
The three hundred years from 1200 to 1500 were the years of the Metrical Romances.
Perhaps one of the most interesting of these Metrical Romances is that of Havelok the Dane.
The Metrical Romances, including the Arthurian Cycle.
Hemans' use of Byron gestures both to the obvious thematic connections between Dante and Arabella Stuart (like Dante, Arabella "love[d] in vain" and was kept imprisoned in "a living tomb"), and to Hemans' indebtedness to Byron's style; like so much of Hemans' poetry, "Arabella Stuart" is a response both to and against the form of Byron's metrical romance.
With Robert Southey, Walter Scott was the principal promulgator of the metrical romance in this first decade of the century.
The Middle English Ideal of Personal Beauty as Found in the Metrical Romance, Chronicles, and Legends of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Centuries.
Amis and Amiles Chief characters in an Old French metrical romance based on an older and widespread legend of friendship and sacrifice.
More importantly, the final dissolution of punishment in Redgauntlet (1825), where a royal pardon illustrates the new power of leniency, can be said to have been anticipated in the pre-Waverley metrical romance The Lady of the Lake (1810), when James V, the epitome of the just and legitimate ruler, pardons Malcolm Graeme and implies that he would even have pardoned his dark adversary Roderick Dhu had the latter lived.
He tells a metrical romance, the first of the stories in the series related by the various pilgrims.
Floire et Blancheflor) A medieval metrical romance in French and English.