Chivalric Romance

(redirected from Metrical romance)

Chivalric Romance

 

an epic genre of courtly literature that poeticized knighthood in the figures of such heroes as King Arthur, Lancelot, Tristan, and Amadís. The chivalric romance poeticized the exploits of knights, performed in the name of glory, love, and moral perfection. The genre’s authors included Chrétien de Troyes, Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, and Thomas Malory (England).

References in classic literature ?
There must have been a Norman original of the Scottish metrical romance of Rauf Colziar, in which Charlemagne is introduced as the unknown guest of a charcoal-man.
Yet Horace Walpole wrote a goblin tale which has thrilled through many a bosom; and George Ellis could transfer all the playful fascination of a humour, as delightful as it was uncommon, into his Abridgement of the Ancient Metrical Romances.
The three hundred years from 1200 to 1500 were the years of the Metrical Romances.
Perhaps one of the most interesting of these Metrical Romances is that of Havelok the Dane.
Hemans' use of Byron gestures both to the obvious thematic connections between Dante and Arabella Stuart (like Dante, Arabella "love[d] in vain" and was kept imprisoned in "a living tomb"), and to Hemans' indebtedness to Byron's style; like so much of Hemans' poetry, "Arabella Stuart" is a response both to and against the form of Byron's metrical romance.
With Robert Southey, Walter Scott was the principal promulgator of the metrical romance in this first decade of the century.
and the stream of his experience is the Middle English metrical romance.
The Middle English Ideal of Personal Beauty as Found in the Metrical Romance, Chronicles, and Legends of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Centuries.
Scott published his last metrical romance, The Lord of the Isles, early in 1815, and with the end of the war later that year resigned his bardic role.
Other contributions include essays by Noel Kissane and Patricia Moloney on the National Folklore Collection's Chapbook collection, by Bo Almqvist on rare editions of Icelandic metrical romances, by Eilis Ni Dhuibhne on the Urban Folklore Project of the early 1980s, a project which concentrated on recording local lore in Dublin city and its environs, and the personal recollections of folklorist Daithi O hOgain.
The narrator explains that "[p]erhaps a little of the harebmined and ardent feeling which he had picked out of old ballads, or from the metrical romances which were his sole source of information or knowledge, may have been the means of pricking him on to some of his achievements, which had often a rude strain of chivalry in them.
But as the earlier metrical romances became prose narratives, she argues, "the lyric remains as a ghost in the prose (47).