metronome

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metronome

(mĕ`trənōm'), in music, originally pyramid-shaped clockwork mechanism to indicate the exact tempo in which a work is to be performed. It has a double pendulum whose pace can be altered by sliding the upper weight up or down. The sliding bob indicates the rate of oscillation by means of calibrations on the pendulum. A number to indicate the rate at which the metronome is to be set and a note whose value is to equal one beat of the metronome are often given on a piece of music, preceded by the initials MM, for Mälzel's Metronome—Johann Mälzel (1772–1838) having made in 1816 the type of metronome in general use today. Beethoven and Schumann left such tempo indications for many of their compositions, but for earlier music and often for later music such indications are those of the editor. A pocket-watch type of metronome was developed in the 1940s; a boxlike electric metronome has also become popular, as well as digital metronomes.

Metronome

 

an instrument for aurally ascertaining the basic time values of the meter (Takf). Metronomes are used to attain the precise execution of the tempo of a musical work.

Instruments similar to the metronome were first made in the 17th century. The modern metronome, which was perfected by the Viennese craftsman J. N. Maelzel and patented in 1816, consists of a wooden pyramidal case with a scale of units, a mainspring, and a pendulum with a sliding weight. The oscillations of the pendulum are accompanied by a strictly even ticking. The number of oscillations per unit of time depends on the location of the weight. To set the metronome for the necessary number of ticks per minute, the weight is placed opposite the appropriate figure on the scale. The metronome is also used in physical culture exercises and laboratory experiments.

metronome

a mechanical device which indicates the exact tempo of a piece of music by producing a clicking sound from a pendulum with an adjustable period of swing
References in periodicals archive ?
The result is no doubt cacophonous and a performance can last around an hour, but apparently after a while, patterns and rhythms present themselves as the 100 metronomes, all set at different tempos, do their stuff.
Novelty metronomes such as those designed as owls, cats and penguins make amusing gifts for young musicians, while the company founded by the great American clockmaker Seth Thomas (1785-1859) even produced a metronome for use in training court stenographers.
A metronome by Johann Nepomuk Maelzel, made in Paris in about 1823
Right: A 20th century Wittner Piccolo metronome in a ruby coloured case
Some of them, of course, will be performing on those metronomes.
We need 100 wind-up metronomes and we have about 20," says the man whose good idea this was.
50 USD, the CD is cheaper than even the most affordable budget metronomes, many of which are known for inferior sound quality and low battery life.
Beckwith hopes that music schools will see the appeal of the Metronome CD as a cost-effective alternative for students on a budget.
My plan was to give the patient a metronome at the end of the therapeutic visit to keep him involved in the treatment and avoid having to shop for one.
With only one metronome and one monitor, this piece was named, singularly, Blind Man Walking, 1996-99.
Metronome is committed to providing its clients with the technology tools to support their business strategies while ensuring maximum productivity," said Erick Lee, President of Metronome.
Recent research (particularly the study on "The Effect of Interactive Metronome Training on Children With ADHD," published in the March/April 2001 issue of The American Journal of Occupational Therapy) has shown that timing is a very important component of human development.