Meuse

(redirected from Meuse (departement))
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Meuse

(möz), department (1990 pop. 196,344), NE France, in LorraineLorraine
, Ger. Lothringen, former province and former administrative region, NE France, bordering in the N on Belgium, Luxembourg, and Germany, in the E on Alsace, in the S on Franche-Comté, and in the W on Champagne.
..... Click the link for more information.
, bordering on Belgium. Bar-le-DucBar-le-Duc
, town (1990 pop. 18,577), capital of Meuse dept., NE France, in Lorraine. It has textile mills, iron foundries, printing plants, and metallurgical and food-processing industries.
..... Click the link for more information.
, the capital, and VerdunVerdun
, town (1990 pop. 23,427), Meuse dept., NE France, in Lorraine, on the Meuse River. A strategic transportation center, Verdun has varied industries and is situated in an agricultural region.
..... Click the link for more information.
 are the chief towns. Its industries include the manufacture of metals, foundry products, wood products, ceramics, and glass. Agriculture is concentrated in the Meuse River valley, where most of the department's people live. Part of the Argonne forest is in the north, and in the forested west and central regions there is extensive animal breeding.

Meuse

(myo͞oz, Fr. möz), Du. Maas, river, c.560 mi (900 km) long, rising in the Langres Plateau, NE France and flowing N past Sedan (the head of navigation) and Charleville-Mézières into S Belgium. It is joined by the Sambre River at Namur. From Namur the Meuse winds eastward skirting the Ardennes, passes LiègeLiège
, Du. Luik, Ger. Lüttich, province (1991 pop. 999,646), 1,526 sq mi (3,952 sq km), E Belgium, bordering on Germany in the east. The chief cities are Liège (the capital), Verviers, Herstal, Huy, and Seraing.
..... Click the link for more information.
, and turns north, where it forms part of the Belgian–Dutch border before swinging westward through SE Netherlands (where it is called the Maas). Near 's Hertogenbosch it branches out to form a common delta with the Rhine River. One branch joins with the Waal River near Gorinchem to form the Merwede River, which flows into the North Sea. The other branch, called the Bergsche Maas, flows into an inlet of the North Sea S of Dordrecht. The Oude Maas (Old Meuse), which is a branch of the Waal, and the Nieuwe Maas (New Meuse), which is a continuation of the Lek River, actually belong to the Rhine estuary. The Meuse is linked with the Belgian port of AntwerpAntwerp,
Du. Antwerpen, Fr. Anvers, city (1991 pop. 467,518), capital of Antwerp prov., N Belgium, on the Scheldt River. It is one of the busiest ports in Europe; a commercial, industrial, and financial center; and a rail junction.
..... Click the link for more information.
 by the Albert Canal and with RotterdamRotterdam
, city (1994 pop. 598,521), South Holland prov., W Netherlands, on the Nieuwe Maas (New Meuse) River near its mouth on the North Sea. One of the largest and most modern ports in the world, Rotterdam is the major foreign-trade center of the Netherlands and its second
..... Click the link for more information.
 and other Dutch ports by the intricate system of Dutch waterways; thus it is one of the chief thoroughfares of Europe. The Belgian section of the Meuse valley, especially around NamurNamur
, Du. Namen, province (1991 pop. 423,317), S Belgium, bordering on France in the south. The chief cities are Namur (the capital) and Dinant. The province is generally hilly; it is drained by the Meuse, Sambre, and Lesse rivers and is traversed in the south by the
..... Click the link for more information.
 and Liège, is an important industrial and mining region. A strategic line of defense, particularly in Belgium and France, the valley has been a battleground in many wars, and most of the cities along its course have been strongly fortified since the Middle Ages.

Meuse

 

a department in northeastern France in Lorraine, in the upper course of the Meuse (Maas) River. Area, 6,200 sq km; population, 205,000 (1973). The administrative center is Bar-le-Duc.

Industry employs 30 percent of the economically active population of Meuse and agriculture, 21 percent (1968). Metallurgical, lumber-processing (on the basis of local logging), and glass-and-ceramics industries are of importance in the department. In the 1960’s large plants for the cable, electrical-engineering, and paper industries were put into operation. There is grain farming, cattle raising, and cheese production.


Meuse

 

(in Flemish, Maas), a river in France, Belgium, and the Netherlands. Length, 925 km; basin area, 36,000 sq km.

The Meuse rises on the Langres Plateau, cuts through the Ardennes, and empties into the left branch of the Rhine River delta. For quite a distance in its lower course the Meuse’s water level is higher than the low-lying plain around it; therefore the river is held back by dikes to prevent flooding. The river is fed primarily by rainfall, as well as snow; high waters come in the winter and spring, and the river may rise as much as 5-8 m. The average discharge of water in the lower course is 300-400 cu m per sec, with a maximum of 3,000 cu m per sec. The Meuse is navigable to its headwaters. Above the city of Sedan the river has locks. The Meuse is connected with the waterway systems of France, Belgium, the Netherlands, and the Federal Republic of Germany by canals, including the Marne-Rhine, Albert, Oise-Sambre, and Ardennes. Cities on the Meuse include Verdun, Sedan (France), Namur, Liege (Belgium), and Maastricht (the Netherlands).

Meuse

1. a department of N France, in Lorraine region: heavy fighting occurred here in World War I. Capital: Bar-le-Duc. Pop.: 191 728 (2003 est.). Area: 6241 sq. km (2434 sq. miles)
2. a river in W Europe, rising in NE France and flowing north across E Belgium and the S Netherlands to join the Waal River before entering the North Sea. Length: 926 km (575 miles)