Meyerbeer


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Related to Meyerbeer: Jakob Liebmann Beer, Jakob Liebmann Meyer Beer, Jakob Meyer Beer

Meyerbeer

Giacomo , real name Jakob Liebmann Beer. 1791--1864, German composer, esp of operas, such as Robert le diable (1831) and Les Huguenots (1836)
References in periodicals archive ?
Meyerbeer ruled the operatic stage; Heine ruled the press.
To provide balance at the 2010 Ring Festival, Antonovich called on LA Opera officials to re-evaluate and rearrange the festival's programming to eliminate the focus on Wagner and incorporate other composers such as Mozart, Puccini, Verdi, Schubert, Schumann, Meyerbeer, Mendelssohn and others.
He condemned the operas (smash-hits at the time) of Giacomo Meyerbeer as "frigid and heartless.
Other popular family hostels with customer ratings of 80 per cent or more include the Hostel Meyerbeer Beach in Nice (from EUR40 per night), the Lybeer Travellers Hostel, Bruges (from EUR35), and the Stayokay Vondelpark, Amsterdam (from EUR30).
of Salzburg; and the Maryville Institute of Birmingham, UK) and Pellegrini (Italian literature and history, Giulio Riva College) provide researchers a comprehensive list of primary and secondary works from Mayerbeer's correspondence and diaries to materials from the Meyerbeer and Scribe Archives,general studies of his life and work (including his fan club web site) and family materials on his ancestry and life as a German Jew.
They will be playing music spanning three centuries, including Johny Barry and Franz Waxman classics, Goff Richards' Hymns of Praise and the Gordon Langford arrangement of the Coronation March from the opera The Prophet by Meyerbeer.
Jews in Music" is directed in part at his former inspirations Felix Mendelssohn and Heinrich Heine, whom he mentions by name, as well as the unnamed onetime benefactor Giacomo Meyerbeer.
This was directed first towards Meyerbeer, to whom Wagner had every reason to be grateful and to whom, for that very reason, he wasn't, and then, with the notorious pamphlet on Jewishness in music, to the entire Hebrew race.
30) "The Coronation March" from the opera, The Prophet, by German composer, Giacomo Meyerbeer.
Meyerbeer apparently imagined her as Fides in his Le Prophete, and Berlioz not only wrote the role of Didon in Les Troyens for her, but revised the music of Gluck's Orphee so that she could perform it (Ashbrook 26).
The tract is full of screeds against the music of Jewish composers, especially the operas of Giacomo Meyerbeer, a French Jew whose operas were immensely popular, especially in Paris.
The third part, 'Grand Operas for Paris', has essays on a wide range of operas including those by Meyerbeer, Halevy, Rossini, Verdi and the range of operas at the Paris Opera in the second half of the nineteenth century.