Michelangelo

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Michelangelo

full name Michelangelo Buonarroti. 1475--1564, Florentine sculptor, painter, architect, and poet; one of the outstanding figures of the Renaissance. Among his creations are the sculptures of David (1504) and of Moses which was commissioned for the tomb of Julius II, for whom he also painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel (1508--12). The Last Judgment (1533--41), also in the Sistine, includes a torturous vision of Hell and a disguised self-portrait. His other works include the design of the Laurentian Library (1523--29) and of the dome of St Peter's, Rome
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of Michelangelo's extant drawings were preparatory sketches for work, not all eventually executed, in these three different fields.
It starts with works by Michelangelo's teacher Domenico Ghirlandaio and contemporaries, and Michelangelo's own earliest drawings and his first painting "The Torment of Saint Anthony.
It's rare for Americans to be aware of Michelangelo's poetry, and his drawings come even further down on the list of works of which they're aware, according to Wallace.
Out of Michelangelo's collaboration with Sebastiano three masterpieces were born: the Pieta for the church of San Francesco in Viterbo (1512-16), the Raising of Lazarus (1517-19), and the Borgherini Chapel in San Pietro in Montorio in Rome (1516-24).
includes a kind of postscript on the Last Judgment, painted 1536-1541, Michelangelo's vision of the afterlife merits more than an afterthought.
Michelangelo's David-Apollo was on exhibit at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.
Wallace neither ignores nor dwells on the subject of Michelangelo's sexuality.
Doliner was called in by a private collector who had discovered and bought the statue, had restored it and found what he thought were Jewish symbols etched onto the bottom of it which might prove the work was Michelangelo's.
Fully finished, these works were presented, according to Giorgio Vasari, Michelangelo's contemporary and early biographer, to teach the young man how to draw.
Michelangelo's Dream mainly consisted of a group of drawings presented to a friend as finished works of art.
Having meticulously studied Michelangelo's panels Saracen contends that the artist filled the frescoes with homoerotic imagery not only as a repudiation of the Church's hypocritical rectitude but also as a reflection of his own (and Adriana's) predilections.