microinstruction

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microinstruction

[¦mī·krō·in′strək·shən]
(computer science)
The portion of a microprogram that specifies the operation of individual computing elements and such related subunits as the main memory and the input/output interfaces; usually includes a next-address field that eliminates the need for a program counter.

microinstruction

A single instruction in microcode. It is the most elementary instruction in the computer, such as moving the contents of a register to the arithmetic logic unit (ALU). It takes several microinstructions to carry out one complex machine instruction (CISC). Also called a "micro-op" or "µop," microinstructions differ within the same computer family and even the same vendor. For example, although all are x86 chips, the microcode for Intel's Pentium 4, Pentium M and AMD's Athlon are not the same. The software programmer never sees microinstructions, and they are not documented for the public. See microcode.
References in periodicals archive ?
It features advanced branch prediction capability, micro-ops fusion for improved instruction execution and a dedicated hardware stack manager that employs sophisticated hardware control for improved stack management.
The Intel Pentium M processor line features architectural enhancements such as a power-optimized 400 MHz system bus, Micro-Ops Fusion and Dedicated Stack Manager for faster execution of instructions at lower power.
2GHz low-voltage Pentium M CPU, and 855GM graphics controller embedded chipset, the CF-29 flies through both standard business and custom industrial/public service agency applications thanks to such embedded technologies as a dedicated stack manager to simplify internal CPU auditing, micro-ops fusion of system operations, and advanced branch prediction, which helps avoid repetitive instruction execution.
Pentium(R) M offers power-optimized system bus, dedicated stack manager, micro-ops fusion and support for Intel's Speedstep(R) technology Intel(R) Mobile Voltage Positioning.