microorganism

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microorganism

[¦mī·krō′ȯr·gə‚niz·əm]
(microbiology)
A microscopic organism, including bacteria, protozoans, yeast, viruses, and algae.
References in periodicals archive ?
But he added: "Data from the comet seems to unequivocally point to micro-organisms being involved.
Beneficial micro-organisms have since been shown to inhabit three main locations in the digestive tract: the stomach, the lower part of the small intestine and the large intestine.
Scott explaned that they can identify about 70,000 micro-organisms per sample - that's something they've never been able to do before, and it allows them to make all kinds of hypotheses and ecological inferences.
So it's important to know what types of micro-organisms from Earth can survive on a spacecraft or landing vehicle.
The benefit of the AnMBR is that the micro-organisms convert these organics into a methane rich bio-gas which can then be used for power generation.
The EC asked Bulgaria Thursday to ensure the correct implementation of Directive 2009/41/EC on activities around genetically modified micro-organisms such as when they are cultured, stored, transported, destroyed or used in any other way.
For the majority of these micro-organisms, people are the source of the problem: a recent study revealed that humans carry 10,000 micro-organisms/c[m.
The complex communities of micro-organisms residing in the GI tract are known as the intestinal microbiota.
Leatherhead Food Research, drawing on its scientific expertise and track record on the identification, evaluation and application of alternative preservatives for food and other applications will then undertake the screening of these short-listed extracts from Aquapharm's collection against a range of different micro-organisms, bacteria and fungi.
Eighty-seven and 146 micro-organisms were isolated from JH and CHB, respectively.
It is a problem facing scientists around the world and Prof Black and his team are taking a different approach by tapping into nature and finding out how micro-organisms found in the soil tackle the problem.
Peer-reviewed papers from a September 2009 conference report on recent work in biohydrometallurgy, the field of microbial ecology which addresses questions concerning not only the diversity and behavior of micro-organisms in commercial operations, but also possible applications of extremophiles coming from very different environments.