microearthquake


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microearthquake

[‚mī·krō′ərth‚kwāk]
(geophysics)
An earthquake with a low intensity, usually less than 3 on the Richter scale. Also known as microquake.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tectonics of the Central Zagros (Iran) deduced from microearthquake seismicity.
It shows the relationship between microearthquake locations beneath the MAR median valley and a volume of lower-than-normal seismic velocities.
Every day there are thousands of microearthquakes beneath the ocean floor, and each one, if properly recorded, can tell us about the nature, depth, and location of the cracking and faulting that occurs in response to plate-motion stresses.
Jones, Triggering of Microearthquakes by Earth Tides, and other Features of the Truckee, California, Earthquake Sequence of September, 1966, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America 58 (1), 215248 (February 1968).
There seems to be a correlation, a direct relationship between the gas injection in the underground storage facility which is 22 kilometres from the coast and the microearthquakes that have occurred," Industry Minister Jose Manuel Soria said in an interview with radio Cadena Cope.
In a separate paper submitted to Geophysical Research Letters, the researchers "report on a broad and unprecedented increase in seismicity rate for microearthquakes over a broad (360 by 120 mile) area across inland Japan, parts of the Japan Sea and the Izu islands, following the 9.
Washington, Feb 26 (ANI): Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology studied seismographs from the earthquake that hit Chile last February and found a statistically significant increase of microearthquakes in central California in the first few hours after the main shock.
It has been well known that microearthquakes can be triggered instantaneously by distant earthquakes.
Shear-wave splitting from microearthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic zone.
Shozo Matsumura, chief of the Advanced Seismicity Analysis Laboratory at the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, made the prediction after analyzing data on microearthquakes.
Heat flow measurements indicated that hydrothermal activity might be occurring on the flanks of this spreading center, and the hundreds of microearthquakes being recorded there were thought to be hydrothermal or volcanic in origin.
The team zeroed in on a set of repeating microearthquakes that occurred near Parkfield over two decades.