microeconomics

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microeconomics

the branch of economics concerned with particular commodities, firms, or individuals and the economic relationships between them
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References in periodicals archive ?
From the perspective of the microeconomic theory of the firm, the questions on the nature of this entity, the enterprise, (opinions made in this area refer to the concept of monism and ontological pluralism) and its changeability are essential.
To obtain OIRA approval, the agency must also show that no alternative regulation achieves a better balance between benefits and costs, as these are defined and measured within the two corners--WTP and WTA--of microeconomic theory.
What sets this study apart is its strict use of neo-classical microeconomic theory, as well as its focus on doctrine and organization, at least in schematic form.
This section reviews the basic microeconomic theory relevant to understanding the competitive nature of maritime firm behavior.
He was a brilliant scholar; he made important contributions to microeconomic theory, but his special talent was in applying theory to real-world issues and problems.
Although basic microeconomic theory and the common sense of
It speaks volumes of the power of J-J Laffont to clarify important issues in microeconomic theory.
To demonstrate the validity of the argument, the author develops a model to test whether the composition of Japanese outward FDI is different from what microeconomic theory would predict.
The author notes with amusement how few microeconomists are actually hired by businesses, which he suggests is partly because simplistic microeconomic theory does not capture the evolutionary path-dependent nature of a business enterprise.
The estimates presented here are consistent with microeconomic theory and appear reasonable.
1992): Microeconomic Theory and Applications (4th edition) New York, Harper Collins
Starting 25 years ago, with generous funding from conservative foundations, the law and economics movement successfully introduced microeconomic theory and the logic of markets to legal scholarship and education.