electrode

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electrode,

terminal through which electric current passes between metallic and nonmetallic parts of an electric circuit. In most familiar circuits current is carried by metallic conductors, but in some circuits the current passes for some distance through a nonmetallic conductor. For example, in electrolysiselectrolysis
, passage of an electric current through a conducting solution or molten salt that is decomposed in the process. The Electrolytic Process

The electrolytic process requires that an electrolyte, an ionized solution or molten metallic salt, complete an
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 current passes through a liquid electrolyte; in a fluorescent lamp current passes through a gas. An electrode is usually in the form of a wire, rod, or plate. It may be made of a metal, e.g., copper, lead, platinum, silver, or zinc, or of a nonmetal, commonly carbon. The electrode through which current passes from the metallic to the nonmetallic conductor is called the anode, and that through which current passes from the nonmetallic to the metallic conductor, the cathode. (Electron flow is in a direction opposite that of conventionally defined current.) In most familiar electric devices, current flows from the terminal at higher electric potential (the positive electrode) to the terminal at lower electric potential (the negative electrode); therefore, the anode is usually the positive electrode and the cathode the negative electrode. In some electric devices, e.g., an electric battery, nonelectric energy is converted to electric energy, causing current to flow within the device from the negative electrode to the positive electrode, so that the anode is the negative electrode and the cathode is the positive electrode.

Electrode

 

a structural component of an electronic, ion, or electrical engineering device or production apparatus. It consists of a conductor with a specific shape, which connects a section of an electric circuit in contact with a working medium—a vacuum (in the practical sense), gas, semiconductor, or liquid—to the remainder of the circuit (which is formed by conductors).

The electrodes of electronic devices (electron tubes, electronbeam instruments, semiconductor devices, and so on) are usually in the form of a plate, grid, cylinder, or the like. They have a wide variety of functions. For example, as cathodes and photocathodes, they act as sources of electrons; as grids (control, shield, and suppressor types) and the electrodes of electron guns, they are used to create within a device electric fields that control the motion of electrons and ions in the working medium; as anodes (plates), they collect electrons.


Electrode

 

in electrochemistry, a metal, oxide, or other electrical conductor in contact with an ionic conductor, such as an electrolytic solution or a fused electrolyte. The most important characteristic of electrodes is the electrode potential established at the electrode-electrolyte boundary. Depending on use, electrodes may be classified as reference, indicator, and other types. Systems of two different electrodes can be used as chemical sources of current; when direct current passes through such systems, they act as electrolytic cells.

electrode

[i′lek‚trōd]
(electricity)
An electric conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.
One of the terminals used in dielectric heating or diathermy for applying the high-frequency electric field to the material being heated.

electrode

1. In arc welding, the component in a welding circuit through which an electric current is conducted between the electrode holder and the arc.
2.In resistance welding, the component through which the electric current in the welding machine passes (usually accompanied by pressure) directly to the work.

electrode

1. a conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves an electrolyte, an electric arc, or an electronic valve or tube
2. an element in a semiconducting device that emits, collects, or controls the movement of electrons or holes

electrode

A device that emits, controls or receives electricity. Typically an end point or wire made of metal or some composite material, there are countless electrodes in electrical and electronics products. For example, in a vacuum tube, the cathode emitter is a "negative" electrode. The transparent wires made of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) that cross an LCD screen are electrodes. See battery, air interface and cathode.
References in periodicals archive ?
The setting of an image-guided workstation for image fusion, target selection, preoperative lead and microelectrode recording (MER) needle insertion trajectory planning; the use of a new edition of the FrameLink software (5.
Construction of Optimal Quasi-conformal Mappings for the 2D-numerical Simulation of Diffusion at Microelectrodes.
To visualize collection on the microelectrode array, we stained the CLL and healthy donor samples with SYBR Green I fluorescent double-stranded DNA dye (Life Technologies).
When the encoder rat responded to the light cue, its brain activity was transmitted through the microelectrodes into a computer, which turned the activity into a simple signal: one single pulse for one lever, several pulses for the other lever.
An analytical expression pertaining to the concentrations and current for homogeneous catalytic reactions with equal diffusion coefficients at hemispherical microelectrodes under non-steady-state conditions are obtained using Duhamel's theorem.
The work presented is focused on the analysis of the DEP force distribution at nanoscale heights above the electrodes dependence on microelectrode size parameters.
While the potential for oil contamination to affect the oxygen microelectrodes had already been established, the data he collected actually demonstrated that this could happen at the Deepwater Horizon site.
Controls had implanted stimulators and microelectrodes that were never turned on.
Specifically, using quadrupolar microelectrodes with a separation of 2 [micro]m that were embedded on the surface of oxidized silicon chips, they demonstrated rapid (< 2 min) capture of vesicular stomatitis virus particles inside 8 [micro]L suspension droplets having physiologically relevant ionic conductivity (880 mS/m) and particle concentrations as low as [10.
The amplifier can be used for EEG, EKG, and extracellular recording using high impedance glass or metal microelectrodes.
2+] and pH were determined with ion-specific microelectrodes that we built for our experiments.
Four working microelectrodes were connected to the analyzer via underwater cables, with two microelectrodes housed in each of two separate Delrin wands, which protected the electrode tips whereas allowing free fluid flow over them.