micronutrient

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micronutrient

[¦mī·krō′nü·trē·ənt]
(biochemistry)
An element required by animals or plants in small amounts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, by discussing the potential role of plant-based sources in decreasing micronutrient malnutrition, Graham and Welch[5] and Welch and Graham[18] report a number of contradictory arguments on the influence of phytic acid on iron absorption.
Its consequences are disastrous: at its worst, micronutrient malnutrition kills.
Specific investments and programmes are also needed to effectively reduce micronutrient malnutrition.
The government should also study how to make policymakers more aware of the profound negative consequences of micronutrient malnutrition.
Unfortunately," he says, "the huge boost in food production was followed by a global increase in micronutrient malnutrition.
Heinz Company Foundation on a unique project to comprehensively map the nutritional status and needs of Bangladesh, and then develop with other key stakeholders a sustainable strategy for eradicating hunger and micronutrient malnutrition in this nation," said John Aylieff, WFP Bangladesh Representative.
000 live births FOCUS AREA Prevention, reduction and control of micronutrient malnutrition deficiencies Strategic objective Indicator Elimination of micronutrient Vitamin A deficiency rate deficiencies among the (serum retinol <20 [micro]g/ population, focusing on dl) vitamin A, iodine and iron deficiencies.
The organization's focus seeks to improve the health and nutrition of vulnerable populations, especially women and children, by reducing micronutrient malnutrition in developing countries.
In 2000, World Vision initiated a nutrition program in Mongolia to address high levels of micronutrient malnutrition, particularly iron and vitamin D deficiencies which cause anemia and rickets.
Changes in agricultural cropping patterns and introduction of new crops can help improve micronutrient malnutrition.
Eighty-five million newborns are protected each year from a significant loss in learning ability because of iodized salt and as a result of the IDD partnership, which also includes: WHO, the World Bank, the International Council for the Control of IDD, the Program Against Micronutrient Malnutrition, the Micronutrient Initiative, USAID, the governments of Australia, Belgium, Canada, the Netherlands and the United States -- and the salt industry.
Importantly, our ability to provide affordable, great-tasting fortified products enables us to make a positive contribution to addressing micronutrient malnutrition in developing countries.