micronutrient

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micronutrient

[¦mī·krō′nü·trē·ənt]
(biochemistry)
An element required by animals or plants in small amounts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Luckily, there are different ways to address micronutrient deficiency.
AM-AG said Sigma is a programme that complements conventional growing practices by supercharging standard NPK fertility with secondary and micronutrient plant nutrition plus biostimulants.
It is know that foliar application by all micronutrients gave significant effect on yield traits and protein content.
Biofortification provides a comparatively cost-effective, sustainable, and long-term means of delivering vitamins and micronutrients to households that might otherwise not have access to, or that cannot afford to have, a fully balanced diet.
The increased plant height with application of micronutrients might be due to its role in synthesis of tryptophan which is a precursor of auxin (IAA) and it is essential in nitrogen metabolism which stimulates growth of the plants similarly iron acts as an important catalyst in the enzymatic reactions of the metabolism and would have helped in larger biosynthesis of photo assimilates thereby enhancing growth of the plants.
the Micronutrient Initiative, World Food Program and other stakeholders worked closely with the ministry to reduce iodine deficiency disorders through universal salt iodization.
The global agriculture micronutrients market is anticipated to expand at a CAGR of 8.
The purpose of application of agricultural micronutrients is not constant globally; it differs with the crop type and soil type.
With the content of micronutrients and dry matter of the different organs, the following indexes were calculated: absorption efficiency = (total nutrient content in the plant) / (dry matter of roots) as Swiader et al.
The micronutrients, iron, manganese, copper and zinc demonstrate poor translocation in plants, causing the micronutrients to move only about 0.
Diversification in diet can ensure intake of micronutrients but, poor tend to rely on cheapest available sources such as wheat and rice.
The Asia-Pacific region accounted for the largest share of the agricultural micronutrients market in 2014, and is also projected to be the fastest-growing market, at a CAGR of 8.