rapid prototyping

(redirected from Microstereolithography)

rapid prototyping

[¦rap·əd ′prōd·ə‚tīp·iŋ]
(industrial engineering)
A modeling process used in product design in which a CAD drawing of a part is processed to create a file of the part in slices, and then a part is built by depositing layer (slice) upon layer of material; includes stereolithography, selective laser sintering, or fused deposition modeling.

rapid prototyping

(programming)
The creation of a working model of a software module to demonstrate the feasibility of the function. The prototype is later refined for inclusion in a final product.

rapid prototyping

Building a part one layer at a time using a method of additive fabrication such as 3D printing. Such parts are used for concept modeling to determine if the product design meets the customer's expectations. The parts are also used for form, fit and function to make sure they work properly with other parts. Contrast with rapid manufacturing. See 3D printing. See also RAD.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study authors made a disc of biodegradable material which can be fixed over the cornea using a combination of techniques known as microstereolithography and electrospinning.
Using a combination of techniques known as microstereolithography and electrospinning, the researchers are able to make a disc of biodegradable material, which can be fixed over the cornea.
Structures made with digital light processing and microstereolithography and rapid prototyping based on two-photon absorption photopolymerization techniques are presented.
Keywords Photopolymers, Rapid prototyping, Biophotopolymers, Digital light processing, Microstereolithography, Two-photon polymerization
With UV-laser microstereolithography, higher resolutions can be achieved compared with DLP.
Terahertz Wave Properties of Micro Patterned Titania and Metallic Glass Particles in Hexagonal Tablets Fabricated Using Microstereolithography
Sun's tiny, prism-shaped cloaking structure, less than 10 millimetres long, was created using a technique called electronic transfer microstereolithography, where researchers use a data projector to project an image on a liquid polymer, then use light to transform the liquid layer into a thin solid layer.