microangiopathy

(redirected from Microvascular disease)
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microangiopathy

[‚mī·krō‚an·jē′äp·ə·thē]
(medicine)
The development of lesions in small blood vessels throughout the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
The predictive variables are age, education, depression, microvascular disease, acute metabolic events, cerebrovascular disease, cardiovascular disease, and having a diabetic foot.
Roughly one-third had at least one macrovascular disease, and 70% at least one microvascular disease.
The new findings not only help explain the molecular mechanisms underlying microvascular disease in diabetes patients, they also suggest that because PGC-1alpha has opposing effects in different cell types, its role as a potential new therapeutic target should be pursued with caution.
Dr Triggle, who is the lead principal investigator of a Qatar Foundation-sponsored National Priorities Research Programme project exploring the effects of diabetes on the vascular system, said that metformin has long been known to reduce morbidity in patients with diabetes-associated microvascular disease, but that until now the reason for this beneficial effect had not been understood.
They found eight factors that were most predictive of dementia -- including microvascular disease, diabetic foot and cerebrovascular disease -- and assigned each a value related to their association with dementia to create an overall score for patients.
These are more subtle than the obvious crushing chest pain often associated with heart attacks, may be because women tend to have blockages not only in their main arteries, but also in the smaller arteries that supply blood to the heart -- a condition called small vessel heart disease or microvascular disease," he explained.
xiv]] If left uncontrolled, type 2 diabetes can lead to serious long-term complications such as macrovascular disease (myocardial infarctions, strokes, peripheral vascular disease) and microvascular disease such as neuropathy leading to amputation, retinopathy resulting in blindness and nephropathy causing end-stage renal disease.
They do point out that glucose prevention does have undoubted benefit in the prevention of microvascular disease, but, that said, there are diminishing returns for such a policy in older patients, those who have had diabetes for a long time, or those who already have advanced complications.
Secondary outcomes included all-cause mortality, development and progression of microvascular disease, frequency of severe hypoglycemia, and progression of retinopathy.
Many have complications of diabetes including retinopathy and microvascular disease.