microwave

(redirected from Microwave Radiation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

microwave,

electromagnetic wave having a frequency range from 1,000 megahertz (MHz) to 300,000 MHz, corresponding to a wavelength range from 300 mm (about 12 in.) to 1 mm (about 0.04 in.). Like light waves, microwaves travel essentially in straight lines. They are used in radar, in communications links spanning moderate distances, and in other applications, such as microwave ovensmicrowave oven,
device that uses microwaves to rapidly cook food. The microwaves cause water molecules in the food to vibrate, producing heat, which is distributed through the food by induction. A special electron tube called a magnetron produces the microwaves.
..... Click the link for more information.
. The equipment used to generate, process, and transmit microwaves is in many respects different from that used with lower frequency radio waves. See waveguidewaveguide,
device that controls the propagation of an electromagnetic wave so that the wave is forced to follow a path defined by the physical structure of the guide. Waveguides, which are useful chiefly at microwave frequencies in such applications as connecting the output
..... Click the link for more information.
; magnetronmagnetron
, vacuum tube oscillator (see electron tube) that generates high-power electromagnetic signals in the microwave frequency range. Its operation is based on the combined action of a magnetic field applied externally and the electric field between its electrodes.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

microwave

[′mī·krə‚wāv]
(electromagnetism)
An electromagnetic wave which has a wavelength between about 0.3 and 30 centimeters, corresponding to frequencies of 1-100 gigahertz; however, there are no sharp boundaries distinguishing microwaves from infrared and radio waves.

microwave

a. electromagnetic radiation in the wavelength range 0.3 to 0.001 metres: used in radar, cooking, etc.
b. (as modifier): microwave generator

microwave

Meaning "small wave," a microwave is a radio signal in the frequency range from 300 MHz to 300 GHz or from 1 to 300 GHz, depending on the rating system. Except for AM and FM radio, shortwave radio and over-the-air TV, almost all other communications systems transmit microwaves, including satellites, cellular systems, wireless LANs and line-of-sight between buildings and across vast distances. See spectrum and millimeter wave.


Early Microwave Tower
Line-of-sight microwaves were first used to transmit across long distances where the terrain was too difficult to lay cable. This tower was installed in 1969 in Boulder Junction, Colorado. (Image courtesy of AT&T.)
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the results, exposed of soybean seeds with microwave radiation improves germination.
The first experiments at 7 Hz modulation frequency demonstrated that the changes, caused by microwave radiation in the EEG alpha and theta frequency bands, varied strongly between subjects and, consequently, were not statistically significant [17].
A residential and commercial oven manufacturer asked Freudenberg-NOK to develop a material that would eliminate microwave radiation leakage and resist high temperatures and aggressive chemicals.
In these articles, we review the microwave engineering limits needed for a wireless communication network to function and the recent published research results on the health risks of long-term exposure to microwave radiation.
However Badri said till date, the UAE has had no record of casualties or diseases from exposure to microwave radiation.
In some places, the microwave radiation looks a little different from the rest of the picture.
Differential damage in bacterial cells by microwave radiation on the basis of cell wall structure.
The scientists used high magnetic fields and microwave radiation to "operate" on the spins in the new material they developed to get an indication of how long the spin could be controlled.
Matzler (remote sensing, University of Bern) combines work on theoretical concepts with experimental results on thermal microwave radiation in this overview of the latest applications in the field.
How many people realise that microwave radiation used for mobile phones, TV transmissions etc is a creator of heat, which adds to global warming?
The absorption and scattering of microwave radiation by the atmosphere of the Earth is considered under a steady state scenario.
Global Resource employs a patent pending process that uses specific frequencies of microwave radiation to extract oils and alternative petroleum products from secondary raw materials.

Full browser ?