microwave

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microwave,

electromagnetic wave having a frequency range from 1,000 megahertz (MHz) to 300,000 MHz, corresponding to a wavelength range from 300 mm (about 12 in.) to 1 mm (about 0.04 in.). Like light waves, microwaves travel essentially in straight lines. They are used in radar, in communications links spanning moderate distances, and in other applications, such as microwave ovensmicrowave oven,
device that uses microwaves to rapidly cook food. The microwaves cause water molecules in the food to vibrate, producing heat, which is distributed through the food by induction. A special electron tube called a magnetron produces the microwaves.
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. The equipment used to generate, process, and transmit microwaves is in many respects different from that used with lower frequency radio waves. See waveguidewaveguide,
device that controls the propagation of an electromagnetic wave so that the wave is forced to follow a path defined by the physical structure of the guide. Waveguides, which are useful chiefly at microwave frequencies in such applications as connecting the output
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; magnetronmagnetron
, vacuum tube oscillator (see electron tube) that generates high-power electromagnetic signals in the microwave frequency range. Its operation is based on the combined action of a magnetic field applied externally and the electric field between its electrodes.
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.

microwave

[′mī·krə‚wāv]
(electromagnetism)
An electromagnetic wave which has a wavelength between about 0.3 and 30 centimeters, corresponding to frequencies of 1-100 gigahertz; however, there are no sharp boundaries distinguishing microwaves from infrared and radio waves.

microwave

a. electromagnetic radiation in the wavelength range 0.3 to 0.001 metres: used in radar, cooking, etc.
b. (as modifier): microwave generator

microwave

Meaning "small wave," a microwave is a radio signal in the frequency range from 300 MHz to 300 GHz or from 1 to 300 GHz, depending on the rating system. Except for AM and FM radio, shortwave radio and over-the-air TV, almost all other communications systems transmit microwaves, including satellites, cellular systems, wireless LANs and line-of-sight between buildings and across vast distances. See spectrum and millimeter wave.


Early Microwave Tower
Line-of-sight microwaves were first used to transmit across long distances where the terrain was too difficult to lay cable. This tower was installed in 1969 in Boulder Junction, Colorado. (Image courtesy of AT&T.)
References in periodicals archive ?
It supports microwave applications and features all of the typical measurements of standard desktop spectrum analyzers such as channel power, occupied bandwidth and adjacent channel power ratio.
He has written articles on quasi-optical components, high temperature superconductors for microwave applications, ferro-electric phase shifters and microwave radiometers, and has been awarded three patents.
3 GHz in the 8902A) and, when configured for microwave applications, a smaller footprint with fewer components.
It is a partially autolyzed yeast-based flavor ingredient that is stable in retort, frozen and microwave applications.
As the largest American producer of GaN-on-SiC RF wafer processing technology, Wolfspeeds GaN HEMTs and MMICs enable enhanced innovation, performance, and efficiency across a broad spectrum of RF and microwave applications for both the commercial and military sectors.
Artificial Transmission Lines for RF and Microwave Applications
As well as reed and electromechanical relays perform, solid-state switching continues to increase the RF and microwave applications it addresses.
The model IMA303 is a surface-mount thick film "T" pad attenuator that is especially suited to RF and microwave applications.
The physical properties of diamond - very high thermal conductivity and very high surface wave velocity of propagation - make it a useful material for thermal and microwave applications.
Headquartered in Saxonburg, Pennsylvania, with manufacturing, sales, and distribution facilities worldwide, the Company produces numerous crystalline compounds including zinc selenide for infrared laser optics, silicon carbide for high-power electronic and microwave applications, and bismuth telluride for thermoelectric coolers.
5 GHz and supports microwave applications in addition to the typical measurements of standard desktop spectrum analyzers.
These microwave applications include alarm systems, antennas, base station resonators, combiners, dielectric resonator oscillators, doppler radar systems, down converters, inductors, low noise blocks, microwave filters and voltage-controlled oscillators.

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