Middle English


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Middle English

the English language from about 1100 to about 1450: main dialects are Kentish, Southwestern (West Saxon), East Midland (which replaced West Saxon as the chief literary form and developed into Modern English), West Midland, and Northern (from which the Scots of Lowland Scotland and other modern dialects developed)
References in periodicals archive ?
Snow As in Jon, Dan and Peter is from the middle English snou, to describe someone with snow-white hair or a very pale complexion.
Iglesias-Rabade (2011) selects for his study a group of twelve Middle English prepositions including aboue, after, at, bi, before, bihinde, biside, in, on, ouer, purgh, and under and studies their attestations in the Middle English part of the Helsinki Corpus.
Cervone's study, rather than focusing on how various Middle English authors represented affective or empathetic identification with scenes of Christ's Passion, investigates how they used poetic form to explore the scriptural metaphor of the Incarnation--the 'Word made flesh'--a figurative expression which holds both literal and symbolic meanings in suspense.
Despite the number of contributions to the topic, in our opinion there is still an important gap in the field, especially from a historical perspective, as the phenomenon has been mostly discussed in relation to Old English (Callaway 1913; Mitchell 1985, [section]1549; Fischer 1996b, 107-133) and Middle English, particularly in registers such as fiction, poetry and correspondence (Jack 1991, 311-341; Fischer 1996a, 247-270; Fischer 1995, 1-30; Manabe 1989; Fischer 1997).
The most significant part of H is the final section, which includes medical recipes (over 200), prognostic texts, and charms in Middle English and which is in the hands of both of the scribes responsible for the copying of the manuscript.
Perhaps the greatest Middle English work in our dialect is "The Vision of Piers Plowman", written in the later 1300s by a man who was probably brought up either in the Malvern Hills in Worcestershire or in the Clee Hills in Shropshire.
It also contains a text of the Middle English verse romance King Horn, which, at some remove, lies behind the ballad of 'Hind Horn' (Child 17).
However interesting for the later intersection of native English broth (< Old English brof) and Anglo-French bruet in the early Middle English and early Scots period, this is of little help in illuminating the Scots use of brose in terms of its distinctive vocalism vis-a-vis bruise and of its specific referents in oatmeal and boiling water.
Of thirteen surviving manuscripts, five contain variations of the head-covering analogy, in Middle French, Middle English, and Late Latin, whereas eight others do not include it, in medieval Latin and Italian.
Gamelyn is a Middle English verse romance that recounts the adventures of the eponymous hero, who finds himself dispossessed by his eldest brother John of the property he had rightfully inherited after the death of his father Sir John of Boundys.
His work is translated from the original middle English deftly, The poems, spread out over four hundred pages offer the original middle English on one side and the contemporary English on the other, offering contrast for those trying to gain a greater understanding of the work.
Middle English furre, "fur trim or lining for a garment," was shortened from the synonymous word furour, or else derived from a verb furren, "to trim or line (a garment) with animal skin.

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