Middle High German


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Related to Middle High German: Middle Low German

Middle High German

High German from about 1200 to about 1500
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to the evidence of the vernacular Dionysius text, which he interprets as indicating a connection to the Lower Rhine, Hamburger points to a number of iconographical motifs in the Rothschild Canticles which, in his view, presuppose knowledge of certain Middle High German textual traditions.
The text, known as Le Palmier, spread remarkably quickly, and before the end of the thirteenth century it had already made its way into Latin, Middle High German, and Middle Dutch religious literature.
Thus the SG redaction of the palm tree treatise was available in both Middle High German and Middle Dutch by the end of the thirteenth century.
A further connection with Middle High German literature can be found in a picture in two parts on fol.
The occurrence of the monstrous races in this form in the Rothschild Canticles does indeed suggest a strong link with Middle High German traditions.
The story of Adam and the herbs could thus have become known in the Low Countries in the course of the reception of the Middle High German Lucidarius.
In light of these considerations, it is not essential to assume a direct relation between the Rothschild Canticles and Middle High German literature and iconography.
Research in this area has scarcely begun, but it is possible to demonstrate that the themes in the Rothschild Canticles which Hamburger associated with Middle High German tradition are actually to be found throughout German, northern French, and Dutch language areas, in constantly changing manifestations.
The strong connection between Middle High German and Middle Dutch religious literature is well exemplified by the Dionysius quotation.
v], a number of Dionysius quotations which form part of a broader complex of texts which stand in some kind of relationship to Middle High German treatises attributed to Eckhart.
39) If the reception of Dionysius in Middle Dutch is truly more extensive than in Middle High German, as is suggested by Riedinger and Honemann, `(Pseudo)-Dionysius Areopagita', then it is rather slow in becoming established.
65) could point to borrowing from Middle High German.