Middle-earth

(redirected from Middleearth)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Middleearth: Hollow Earth

Middle-earth

an old-fashioned name for “world”: scene of J. R. R. Tolkien’s fantasies. [Br. Lit.: The Hobbit; The Lord of the Rings]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Realm of Faerie and the Shadow of Homer in Narnia and Middleearth.
com notes that "customers who bought this book also bought" The Lord of the Rings, The Complete Guide to MiddleEarth, and other Tolkein-related titles.
Those wishing to take part can learn about how the lost hamlet of Sarehole and natural splendour of Moseley Bog later inspired Tolkien in the creation of Middleearth and The Shire, the fictional land of the Hobbits.
A popular position (if we judge from Peter Jackson's reimagining of Tolkien's vision), and indeed one backed up by many of the texts of Middleearth themselves, would suggest that the primary ability of Isildur's Bane is the promise of military power and empire.
There's Bilbo Baggins' house in Bag End, a map of Middleearth, runic writing and mystic symbols including the evil eye of sinister sorcerer Sauron.
THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING (12A) Peter Jackson's audacious, wildly imaginative and boundlessly thrilling adaptation of JRR Tolkein's trilogy, which reaches its cataclysmic conclusion with a titanic confrontation between good and evil that will decide the fate of MiddleEarth.
The world of local government finance is a strange MiddleEarth,inhabited by creatures who emerged once a year from their grottoes with a figure of how much each council will get from Whitehall.
It sounds to me like the ideal pastime for the fantasy nerd who has everything - now where on MiddleEarth did I put Bob's phone number?
It's across the road from Sarehole Mill, one of Brum's great inspirations for Middleearth, along with the nearby Moseley Bog and the "two towers" close to Edgbaston Reservoir.
Lewis's insistence on submitting to rigid hierarchical authority and ultimately to God, as opposed to Philip Pullman's constant questioning--which is perhaps one of the reasons I cannot find myself entirely comfortable in Lewis's worlds and prefer the more fluid hierarchies of Middleearth.
In the dialectic between "roots" and "branches" in the study of Tolkien's works, Tolkien Studies VI emphasizes the roots, or the ground from which those roots drew nourishment, rather than the branches, or subsequent works that have appeared since the writing and publication of the literature of Middleearth.