midge

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midge,

name for any of numerous minute, fragile fliesfly,
name commonly used for any of a variety of winged insects, but properly restricted to members of the order Diptera, the true flies, which includes the housefly, gnat, midge, mosquito, and tsetse fly.
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 in several families. The family Chironomidae consists of about 2,000 species, most of which are widely distributed. The herbivorous larvae are found in all freshwaters; the larvae of some species live in saltwater. Midge larvae are an important source of food for larger aquatic insects and fish. The larvae of some species of the genus Chironomus, which are called freshwater bloodworms, are unusual in that they contain the protein hemoglobin. The pupae are active and aquatic. The adults, which look like slender mosquitoes, are often seen swarming over or near water, and large courting and mating swarms may contain millions of insects. The larvae and pupae of the net-wing midges, family Blepharoceridae, live in fast-flowing freshwater; they attach to rocks by suction disks and feed mainly on algae. The biting midges belong to the genus Culicoides of the family Ceratopogonidae; they are the smallest of the bloodsucking insects and are common pests in the NE United States, where they are called punkies, sand flies, and no-see-ums. The adults have mouthparts that pierce and suck and inflict irritating bites on humans; some species ride the wings of dragonflies and lacewings, sucking the blood of their hosts. Gall midges, family Cecidomyiidae, damage many plants by causing formation of plant galls in which the larvae live (see gnatgnat,
common name for any one of a number of small, fragile-looking two-winged flies of the suborder Nematocera, order Diptera, which includes the families Tipulidae (crane flies), Bibionidae (hairflies), Ceratopogonidae (biting midges), Chironomidae (true midges), Cecidomyidae
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). Midges are classified in the phylum ArthropodaArthropoda
[Gr.,=jointed feet], largest and most diverse animal phylum. The arthropods include crustaceans, insects, centipedes, millipedes, spiders, scorpions, and the extinct trilobites.
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, class Insecta, order Diptera.

midge

[mij]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of various dipteran insects, principally of the families Ceratopogonidae, Cecidomyiidae, and Chironomidae; many are biting forms and are vectors of parasites of man and other vertebrates.

midge

1. any fragile mosquito-like dipterous insect of the family Chironomidae, occurring in dancing swarms, esp near water
2. any similar or related insect, such as the biting midge and gall midge
References in periodicals archive ?
Midges have been around since prehistoric times and most don't bite - but the Scots species Culicoides impunctatus does.
The midges are swarming all over Cardiff, biting thousands of people, who wake up next day to find themselves scratching at a painful lump or a large blister.
Everything the municipality has done so far to combat midges was appropriate.
In the Antarctic ecosystem, these midges eat bacteria and algae as well as nitrogen-rich waste produced by penguins.
borrichiae and aggregate parasitism levels can reach 100% at some sites causing local extinction of the midges and it has been hypothesized that decreased size and fecundity of the midge on the 2 Iva spp.
Female midges were categorized as nulliparous, parous, gravid, or freshly blood fed (engorged) (3); only midges belonging to the first 3 categories were assayed.
The NFU issued information about the product as concern grows about potential Schmallenberg infection by midges biting livestock over the next few weeks.
Project partner Swansea University has just published its latest findings on work which looks at using a fungus - Metarhizium anisopliae - to control biting midges, populations of which could increase with climate change.
They are also developing lures, using chemicals known to be in human and animal odours, to attract midges to "kill sites", so maximising effectiveness.
Also, according to the study that examined the feeding preferences of the holiday-wrecking insects, women seem to react more than men to the midges.
The monitoring station in Argyll recorded 58,000 midges last week, down by half on the week before and 40 times less than in early June.