Nyika

(redirected from Mijikenda)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Nyika

 

(Wanjika), a people in Kenya, inhabiting the shore regions of Malindi, Kilifi, Kwale, and, in part, Mombasa. Their population, including other closely related peoples (Digo, Duruma, Giryama, Rabai, and others), is approximately 400,000 (1967, estimate). Their language is Kinyika (Nyika), which belongs to the eastern group of Bantu languages. The Nyika were exposed to Swahili and Arabic influence. Most of the Nyika profess the Islamic faith (Sunnite sect); some preserve the traditional beliefs of their ancestors. Their main occupation is farming (including fishing among the Digo and cattle raising among the Duruma). Seasonal migratory work on plantations (sisal and other crops) and in cities is increasing.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
They include Lamu Old Town, Fort Jesus, Kenya's Lake Systems, the Lake Turkana national park, Mt Kenya national park and Mijikenda Kaya forests.
For example, I visited the World Heritage Site, Sacred Mijikenda Kaya Forests in Kenya, which consists of guarded sacred forests.
But school officials believed the hand-carved totems were stolen from Kenya's Mijikenda tribe, which uses them as spiritual markers to memorialize an elder's death.
4) In the case of the latter, members of the Kamba and Kikuyu communities were warned to return to their ancestral territories and to leave the province for Mijikenda communities.
They formed part of a wider movement that recognised the Bantu roots of the Swahili language (Nurse & Spear 1985) and the similarities between the contemporary Swahili and hinterland groups such as the Mijikenda, who occupy the hinterland of the Kenya coast (Allen 1981; 1993).
In mid-February 2007 a mob killed an 81-year-old man of the Mijikenda community in Kilifi District, Coast Province, alleging that he had cursed his three grandchildren who had died a few days earlier.
This concept has a parallel among the Luhya of Busia in what they refer to as ekhir, and the Giriam of the Mijikenda and Chaga of Tanzania as chirwa.
5) Both Chakacha and Msondo are traditional musical performances of the African communities commonly referred to as Mijikenda who live in close contact with the Swahili of the Kenyan coast.
It was not long before Krapf was engaged in language study, working first on Kiswahili (he quickly recognized its debt to Arabic), and then on Kinika (Kirabai), the language of the people now known as the Mijikenda.
The election results revealed that President Moi topped the poll among his own Kalenjin group of tribes and their political allies such as the Pokot, Turkana, Teso, Samburu, Maasai, Somalis, Borans and Mijikenda of the Coast Province.
Charles Ambler, Kenyan Communities in the Age of Imperialism (New Haven, 1988); Justin Willis, Mombasa, the Swahili and the Making of the Mijikenda (Oxford, 1993).