Milankovitch cycles

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Milankovitch cycles

[mē·lən′kō·vich ‚sīk·əlz]
(geophysics)
Periodic variations in the earth's position relative to the sun as the earth orbits, affecting the distribution of the solar radiation reaching the earth and causing climatic changes that have profound impacts on the abundance and distribution of organisms, best seen in the fossil record of the Quaternary Period (the last 1.6 million years).
References in periodicals archive ?
The Milankovitch cycles The explanation for the cyclical alternation of ice and warm periods stems from Serbian mathematician Milutin Milankovitch (1879-1958), who calculated the changes in Earth's orbit and the resulting insolation on Earth, thus becoming the first to describe that the cyclical changes in insolation are the result of an overlapping of a whole series of cycles: the tilt of Earth's axis fluctuates by around two degrees in a 41,000-year cycle.
Since this study, the National Research Council of the US National Academy of Sciences has embraced the Milankovitch Cycles model.
Known as Milankovitch cycles after the first scientist to fully compute them from planetary data, it has been shown that these factors have regulated the advance and retreat of ice-caps.
Milankovitch cycles and other climate rhythms that operate at different timescales), dynamically patterned disorder (termed chaos by Gleick 1987) and real randomness in the climate system are equally applicable to global markets and economies.
Certainly, in this causal chain linking the cosmic masses for the Milankovitch cycles to the individuals of a terrestrial population, it may be possible to arrive at demographic parameters, but recent demographers no longer refer to a macro causal chain.
Assign a team of students to research Milankovitch Cycles and to conduct a seminar on the phenomena for the class.
Researchers believe that the cyclic changes in the earth's orbit cause climate changes known as Milankovitch cycles.
Together, these Milankovitch cycles influence how much sunlight, or energy, reaches different areas of the planet.
Our politicians blindly go down the path of believing that the slight increase in global temperature over the last 180 years has got something to do with man's activities rather than the obvious effect of our gradual emergence from the last ice age and prior to our decent into the next one; all of which is caused by the three Milankovitch cycles of the earth's movement around the sun over periods of 96,000 years, 40,000 and 22,000 respectively.
Weedon demonstrates the applicability of time series analysis to a wide temporal range of palaeoenvironmental data ranging from annual to Milankovitch cycles.
In addition to the broad record of climatic change, the detail of the ice-core record has also revealed short-term periodicities which may be `overtones' of the Milankovitch cycles (Kerr 1996).