Milarepa


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Milarepa

(mĭlär`əpə), 1040–1143, saint and poet of Tibetan BuddhismTibetan Buddhism,
form of Buddhism prevailing in the Tibet region of China, Bhutan, the state of Sikkim in India, Mongolia, and parts of Siberia and SW China. It has sometimes been called Lamaism, from the name of the Tibetan monks, the lamas [superior ones].
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. He was the second patriarch of the Kargyupa sect, the first being Milarepa's guru Marpa (1012–97), who studied under Naropa, the Bengali master of Tantra, at Nalanda. Milarepa's autobiography recounts how in his youth he practiced black magic in order to take revenge on relatives who deprived his mother of the family inheritance. He later repented and sought Buddhist teaching. After undergoing many tests and ordeals under Marpa, he received initiation from him. He spent the rest of his life meditating in mountain caves and teaching his disciples.

Bibliography

See L. Lhalunga, The Life of Milarepa (1984).

Milarepa

(tool)
A Perl BNF parser generator by Jeffrey Kegler <jeffrey@netcom.com>. Milarepa takes a source grammar written in a mixture of BNF and Perl and generates Perl source, which, when enclosed in a simple wrapper, parses the language described by the grammar. Milarepa is not restricted to LRn grammars, and the parse logic follows directly from the BNF. It handles ambiguous grammars, ambiguous tokens (tokens which were not positively identified by the lexer) and allows the programmer to change the start symbol. The grammar may not be left recursive. The input must be divided into sentences of a finite maximum length. There is no fixed distinction between terminals and non-terminals, that is, a symbol can both match the input AND be on the left hand side of a production. Multiple Marpa grammars are allowed in a single Perl program.

Version: Prototype 1.0.

Posted to comp.lang.perl.

The author is seeking an FTP site to hold the software.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kagyu Dakshang Chuling Dharma Center - A Milarepa Empowerment will be given by Venerable Lama Tsang Tsing at 2 p.
These include Acho Phento, the Hunter's servant in the Dance of Milarepa, or the gadpo and gadmo, "old man and old woman, the ancestors", in central and eastern Bhutan.
His teacher Marpa makes it very clear that they were meant to purify Milarepa of his evil karma.
The rapper's later musical works were influenced by his new-found religion and Yauch set up and donated generously to the Milarepa Fund which he set up to support Tibetan independence.
Milarepa took "no pleasure in the worldly life" and wanted nothing more than "a life of meditation and devotion" (Evans-Wentz, 1969, 178).
Tconches and bells resounded in the air as the absolutely beautiful Princess Sonam Dechen Wangchuck and the heir presumptive to the throne of Bhutan, Prince Jigyel Ugyen Wangchuck, occupied the first row along with the Indian High Commissioner to Bhutan on a nippy Friday night to watch dancers from the Royal Academy of Performing Arts ( RAPA) of the kingdom presenting the dancedrama Milarepa and the Hunter .
What I am a bit unhappy about is Gold's treatment of Milarepa and Jigten Gonpo's traditions in a way that somehow follows traditional stereotypes.
In my essay on that novel, I suggest that the magical world of the twelfth-century Tibetan saint Milarepa is superimposed on the twentieth-century world of Bucky Wunderlick and that boundaries between worlds are violated when Michelle, whom I take to be a Buddhist bodhisattva who deferred nirvana centuries back and continues to be reborn to help people attain Enlightenment, reaches out to Bucky.
Presenting the life stories of several enlightened masters including Tilopa, Naropa, Marpa, Milarepa, Gampopa, and others, The Great Kagyu Masters is part biography, part religious history, and part insight into principles and teachings of this dynamic path of Tibetan Buddhism.
In Malpais: Hotel Milarepa, +506-640-0023; or for the real Malpais experience, stay at any beachfront surfer campground.
The story is told of the ascetic Tibetan yogi Milarepa (twelfth century C.