Miles and Flora

Miles and Flora

apparently sweet children assume wicked miens mysteriously. [Am. Lit.: The Turn of the Screw]
See: Evil
References in periodicals archive ?
7) At the least, such hints point toward Miles and Flora knowing of a sexual relationship between Quint and Miss Jessel and understanding enough about it that they abetted the trysts--if not, in fact, learning enough to model their own behavior from what they witnessed.
Henry James says of his creations Miles and Flora that he "evoked the worst [he] could" (Letters 88), and Miles and Flora's preternatural beauty can certainly be read as a monstrosity by nineteenth-century century standards.
While the film offers plenty of signs that the ghosts of servants may indeed be taking advantage of what James calls the children's "helpless plasticity," it also proliferates with suggestions of the influence that both Miles and Flora themselves seem to exert over natural elements, especially of the air itself.
While in the novella the governess notes that Miles and Flora "were extraordinarily at one," the "traces of little understandings between them" (64) she witnesses are pronounced in the film, including the knowing glances they give each other when Miles asks about the governess's old home--"Was it too small for you to have secrets?
It is told from the viewpoint of the leading character, a governess in love with her employer, who goes to an isolated English estate to take charge of Miles and Flora, two attractive and precocious children.