milk intolerance

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Related to Milk allergy: lactose intolerance

milk intolerance

[′milk in′täl·ə·rəns]
(medicine)
Extreme sensitivity to milk due to allergy to milk protein or lactose deficiency; characterized by diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and vomiting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Protein chains, where present, are of sufficiently small length to make it extremely likely that they will comply with the definition of hypoallergenicity as being tolerated by 90% of proven sufferers from cow's milk allergy, and they should therefore be labelled as suitable for the dietary management of subjects with cow's milk protein allergy.
The British Medical Journal says most children with milk allergy outgrow it at an average age of five years for IgE-mediated cows' milk allergy.
If cow's milk allergy findings and a diagnosis of cow's milk allergy is made, fully hydrolyzed or amino acid based formula are recommended.
To learn more about childhood milk allergy and how it is being diagnosed we administered a web-based survey to approximately 40,000 households that were statistically representative of the U.
Milk allergy, egg allergy, nut allergy, fish allergy, shellfish allergy, soy allergy, sun allergy and wheat allergy.
Researchers at the University of Nebraska explained that thermal and nonthermal processing of foods can change the proteins responsible for milk allergy in ways that make the proteins harder to detect using the standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).
According to Gaby, cow's milk allergy can cause inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn's disease, chronic nasal congestion, fatigue, depression, migraine headache, and arthritis symptoms.
A cow's milk allergy (to the proteins in milk) affects up to seven per cent of babies under one year, but most outgrow it by the age of six.
Partially hydrolyzed formulas should not be fed to infants who are allergic to milk or to infants with existing milk allergy symptoms.
One approach is not right for all children with milk allergy.
We were struck by the fact that just in our practice we had seven patients with milk allergy who reacted.
These children had significant milk allergy, and were unlikely to outgrow it without some type of treatment.