bucket

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bucket

1. any of various bucket-like parts of a machine, such as the scoop on a mechanical shovel
2. a cupped blade or bucket-like compartment on the outer circumference of a water wheel, paddle wheel, etc
3. Computing a unit of storage on a direct-access device from which data can be retrieved
4. Chiefly US a turbine rotor blade

Bucket

 

(in Russian, kovsh), in mining and construction machinery, a device for gripping and removing a portion of the earth (rock, material, and so on) from the matrix and moving it to the unloading area. The bucket should cut easily into the material being worked (for this the bucket may have a cutting edge, usually with teeth), and it should be sufficiently strong and durable. In addition, it should be easily filled and emptied. The buckets are attached to chains (chain-and-bucket excavators and loaders, bucket dredges, and drags), a rotor (rotary excavators), arms (power shovels and loaders), or a bucket frame or are suspended from a bearing structure of draglines and clamshells by chains and cables. The force necessary for cutting or digging up the material being worked is imparted to the buckets through these devices. The buckets may be cast, welded, or stamped. The buckets are usually unloaded on the side of the cutting edge or by opening the bottom, less frequently by forcing the earth out with a special scraper or a movable rear wall.

The bucket capacity of a mechanical shovel ranges from 0.15 to 200 eu m; for chain bucket excavators, 0.007 to 7 cu m; for single-bucket loaders, 0.07 to 30 cu m; for multibucket loaders, 0.005 to 0.1 cu m; for scrapers, 0.75 to 60 cu m; and for dredges, 0.05 to 1 cu m. Multibucket loaders, excavators, and dredges usually have 12 to 50 buckets; rotary excavators, six to 18.

The rotor blades of a bucket hydraulic turbine may also be called buckets. Elevators and conveyers may also be equipped with monorail buckets.


Bucket

 

the working element (scoop) of a scraper unit equipped with a cableway, used in excavating, transporting, and similar operations above the ground, underground, and underwater. The bucket is moved by a winch with a block and tackle.

REFERENCES

Dombrovskii, N. G. and M. I. Gal’perin. Zemleroino-transportnye mashiny. Moscow, 1965.
See also references under EXCAVATING MACHINES.

bucket

[′bək·ət]
(botany)
(computer science)
A name usually reserved for a storage cell in which data may be accumulated.
(engineering)
A cup on the rim of a Pelton wheel against which water impinges.
A reversed curve at the toe of a spillway to deflect the water horizontally and reduce erosiveness.
A container on a lift pump or chain pump.
A container on some bulk-handling equipment, such as a bucket elevator, bucket dredge, or bucket conveyor.
A water outlet in a turbine.

bucket

An attachment for a materials-handling or excavating machine that digs or carries loose materials such as earth, gravel, stone, or concrete; may be shaped like a scoop, with provision for opening and closing for convenience in unloading.

bucket

A reserved amount of memory that holds a single item or multiple items of data. Bucket is somewhat synonymous to "buffer," although buffers are usually memory locations for incoming data records, while buckets tend to be smaller holding areas for calculations. See hash table, buffer and variable.
References in periodicals archive ?
You can actually run your milk bucket off your car's intake manifold but once again you need a vacuum gauge and a way to control your vacuum.
Dairy calves raised in the cattle farms are kept in individual or group pens furnished with feed and water- milk buckets.
When it was time for picking Dad would come out of the house, look in every direction for at least 20 minutes, ease out to the barn and return with three Karo syrup cans and a couple of two-gallon milk buckets.
He was contacted by her daughter Mrs Foster, of Styvechale, who sent these pictures of Mrs Goodman with the two milk buckets, and husband Earnest who started the milk round from his home in Shakespeare Street.
He elevates the status of found objects from everyday items of rural India to artworks - cow dung, milk buckets, scooters, guns and gulal powder.
Some of the prices achieved included: Imperial butter churn, pounds 340; pig killing bench, pounds 50; horse drawn potato lifter, pounds 130; horse drawn root gapper, pounds 170; oak cider and fruit press, pounds 70; old photographs, pounds 90; back can, pounds 105; fiddle drill, pounds 105; 17 gallon milk churns, pounds 80; tractor seats ( two, pounds 70; black cart and shelves, pounds 300; hand scythe, pounds 45; Allen scythe, pounds 50; 12 spoke cart wheels, pounds 140; stainless milk churn, pounds 60; 3 milk buckets, pounds 40; wooden turnip drill, pounds 150; old stone boot scrape, pounds 90; early wooden root chopper, pounds 70.