torr

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torr

a unit of pressure equal to one millimetre of mercury (133.322 newtons per square metre)

Torr

 

a subsidiary unit of pressure equal to 1/760 of an atmosphere. More precisely, a torr is equal to 101,325 newtons per m2 ÷ 760 = 133.322 newtons per m2, or 133.322 pascals. The torr was named in honor of E. Torricelli; the international symbol is Torr. An equivalent unit, the millimeter of mercury (mm Hg), is used more often in Russian scientific literature.

torr

[tȯr]
(mechanics)
A unit of pressure, equal to 1/760 atmosphere; it differs from 1 millimeter of mercury by less than one part in seven million; approximately equal to 133.3224 pascals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Intraocular pressure (IOP) is a key measurement taken by eye specialists when screening people for glaucoma; IOP is considered elevated when it measures above 21 millimeters of mercury.
Mechanical tests revealed that the cultured artery could withstand a burst pressure between 200 and 300 millimeters of mercury (mmHg), the standard unit for blood pressure, said Wang.
Compared to non-drinkers with normal blood pressure, researchers found that the risk of cardiovascular death in men with blood pressure of at least 168 /100 millimeters of mercury was:
The average pulse pressure is usually below 50 millimeters of mercury, but in dialysis patients it is often much higher, says Preston Klassen, a physician at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.
6 - 752 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) of negative pressure and provided that the "screen means" term describing the dressing is an open-cell polymer foam.
A systolic blood pressure reading is considered to be "high" if it is 140 or more millimeters of mercury.
Individuals with systolic pressure at or above 140 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) or diastolic blood pressure at or above 90 mmHg are considered to have high blood pressure, also called hypertension.
Doses were titrated up if the clinic blood pressure was greater than 130/85 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg).
Compared to non-drinkers with normal blood pressure, researchers found that the risk of cardiovascular death in men with blood pressure of at least 168 /100 millimeters of mercury was: three times higher overall, four times higher if they were binge drinkers, consuming six or more drinks on one occasion, and twelve times higher if they were heavy binge drinkers, consuming 12 or more drinks on one occasion.
Cutting back further is particularly important if you have high blood pressure (a systolic, or top number over 140 millimeters of mercury, or a diastolic, or bottom, number over 90 mm/Hg).
Mice given high doses of IL-2 experience significant blood pressure drops--from an average of 100 millimeters of mercury to less than 40 mm Hg.