torr

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torr

a unit of pressure equal to one millimetre of mercury (133.322 newtons per square metre)

Torr

 

a subsidiary unit of pressure equal to 1/760 of an atmosphere. More precisely, a torr is equal to 101,325 newtons per m2 ÷ 760 = 133.322 newtons per m2, or 133.322 pascals. The torr was named in honor of E. Torricelli; the international symbol is Torr. An equivalent unit, the millimeter of mercury (mm Hg), is used more often in Russian scientific literature.

torr

[tȯr]
(mechanics)
A unit of pressure, equal to 1/760 atmosphere; it differs from 1 millimeter of mercury by less than one part in seven million; approximately equal to 133.3224 pascals.
References in periodicals archive ?
8 millimeters of mercury in the oldest participants, and by 9.
A person who has a blood pressure of 140 over 90 has a pressure in the artery (aorta) of 140 millimeters of mercury when the heart contracts and pumps the blood and 90 millimeters of mercury of residual blood pressure when the heart is not contracting.
High blood pressure is typically defined as a measure of 140/90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or higher.
The study involved eight women and seven men who had a systolic blood pressure between 140 to 159 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg), did not have other medical complications and were not taking blood pressure medication.
If you have been sitting quietly for at least five minutes, then the pressures in your two arms should be very similar usually within 10 to 15 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) of each other.
After 16 weeks, the transcendental meditation group had lower systolic blood pressure--123 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) versus 130 mmHg--and improved insulin resistance compared to the control group.
Elderly women with little social support had an average blood pressure of 137 over 82 millimeters of mercury, while elderly women with pets had an average blood pressure of 116 over 77, she said.
Blood pressure is expressed in millimeters of mercury (e.
People should aim for a blood pressure reading of less than 120/80 millimeters of mercury, a lipid level below 200 milligrams of total cholesterol per deciliter, and a body mass index between 18.
In most people, the difference in blood pressure between arms is only a few millimeters of mercury (mmHg), but it may be 10 mmHg or more in about one-third of people, by some estimates.
If you have been sitting quietly for at least five minutes prior to a BP reading, the pressures in your two arms should be within 10 to 15 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) of each other.
A cuff that's too small will result in a falsely elevated reading -- sometimes by 25-30 millimeters of Mercury.