Mills, Clark

Mills, Clark,

1810–83, American sculptor, b. Onondaga co., N.Y. Self-taught in art, he designed and in 1852 cast in an experimental foundry the statue of General Jackson for Lafayette Square, Washington, D.C. Mills had never seen his subject nor an equestrian statue. The daring pose of the horse was a mechanical triumph. Later Mills made a colossal statue of Washington on horseback, and he cast in his foundry Thomas Crawford's Armed Freedom for the Capitol dome.

Mills, Clark

(1810–83) sculptor, bronze founder; born near Syracuse, N.Y. He had little formal education, moved to Charleston, S.C. (1837), and settled in Washington, D.C. (1850). He is known for establishing an early bronze foundry where he cast his sculptures, such as the equestrian statue of Gen. Andrew Jackson (1853), situated in Lafayette Square, Washington, D.C.
References in periodicals archive ?
law firm of Redden, Mills, Clark and Shaw, discussed a meeting Shaw attended on March 31, 2014, with Alabama One's former Business Lending Manager Tammy Ewing, Alabama One CEO John Dee Carruth and Alabama One attorney Paul Toppins.
When speaking about miracle worker Mills, Clark said: "It's a dream for every player.
Before beginning the season as first jockey to Mills, Clark had ridden winners for the trainer on the all-weather.