Miloslavskii

Miloslavskii

 

a noble family that came to Rus’ from Lithuania at the end of the 14th century.

The Miloslavskiis rose during the mid-17th century, when Tsar Aleksei Mikhailovich married Maria Il’inichna Miloslavskaia and when B. I. Morozov, the tsar’s tutor, married her sister Anna. The father of Maria and Anna, Il’ia Danilovich Miloslavskii, was made a boyar and headed the government after the Moscow uprising of 1648. During the Peasant War led by S. T. Razin in 1670–71, Ivan Bogdanovich Miloslavskii, voevoda (military governor) of Simbirsk, aided in the suppression of the rebellion and in the savage reprisals taken against Razin’s supporters. With the accession in 1689 of Peter I, the son of Aleksei Mikhailovich and his second wife, N. K. Naryshkina, the influence of the Miloslavskiis declined. The family died out at the end of the 18th century.

References in periodicals archive ?
Considering the lion in this context, the reader can be overcome by a stream-of-consciousness concatenation of images of royal power: the lion of Judah, Solomons throne, the lions of Vladimir, the base of the Throne of Monomakh and the lion footstools of the tsars, Byzantine lions and their counterparts at Kolomenskoe, the lion gates of the ancient world and the lions on the north gate of the Oprichnina Palace and in the decor of the Faceted Chambers (Granovitaia palata), Terem, and Miloslavskii Chambers (later the Poteshnaia palata) in the Kremlin.
Boyar Miloslavskii and the Auditing Chancellery," Russian History 25, 1-2 (1998).
Sedov rejects most of the later rumors about Matveev and the Naryshkins, but he does stick to the notion that there was already a fully developed rivalry with the Miloslavskii clan.